stressors

Historically, there are antecedents surely, but now there is just so much at stake due to climate, justice, nuclear missiles
It has finally happened. You are adrift. A raft of badly lashed-together memories and a few fairly buoyant facts: That watercraft is you. But thanks to an article in The Brown Daily Herald, the Ivy League university's student paper, you are listing badly. You are at sea.
The early euphoria of finally being divorced has turned into a steady stream of stressors that has elevated my cortisol levels to a new high. But I'm managing because I know it will get easier and overall my children and I are happy and healthy.
In a profound sense, vulnerability is the path to self-reflection. It is at the moment you become emotionally honest that you are more conscious of listening and understanding. Once your suit of armor has been removed, you can bring choice, strength and opportunity to the stressors in life. So take a leap of faith and embrace the positive aspects of learning to be vulnerable.
If you have a difficult boss, you're not alone. I've been there, done that and lived to tell. According to a recent survey, 60 percent of respondents said their boss damaged their self-esteem and one-third said their supervisor didn't remain calm and constructive. Here are several ways to handle that tough boss.
When you're helping someone build resilience, you're a witness, guide, and resource while that person undergoes the struggle. What you want is for your teen to come through the academic pressure or the break up of a friendship with a stronger sense of self and belief in his or her abilities.
Thriving isn't exclusive to painting or poetry. It's whatever you are driven to be and do. What Maya Angelou modeled was a complete commitment to the expression of her wonderfulness. She showed what it looked like to thrive on a grand scale.
Identifying the most pronounced sources of stress in your life is rarely difficult. Understanding how multiple sources of stress in your life act in concert to create your own individualized risk and resiliency profile is more complex.
I pledge to de-stress my life, even if it's a handful of minor things that clutter my mind and leave me feeling weighed down.
This year there is a major therapeutic paradigm shift going on right before our eyes, as 2013 is the proverbial tipping point for acupuncture meridian tapping.
The operative word here about stress is that it is a perception, also known as a thought or point of view. There are objective stressors, to be sure. But how these affect us determines our body's stress response.
I can't entirely escape stress. No one can. Our collective experience requires that we endure at least a certain amount of anxiety, especially when we strive for bigger goals that take us outside our comfort zone.
Admittedly, I still have a long way to go in tackling the more deep-seated anxieties and insecurities that often cause me stress. But I am slowly beginning to let go of some of the "small stuff" that add unnecessary anxiety to my life.
The survival instinct designed to give us tools to fight or flee has turned on us. Now that it is on inappropriately, this response can have the opposite effect. Instead of saving our lives, it can contribute to insomnia, depression, panic attacks, and a host of other health concerns.
Despite being a stage-five worrier, I try to keep my anxiety in its proper perspective. But after researching and writing a piece published earlier this week about what stress is doing to your body, I realized I still have a long way to go when it comes to handling the ever-present stress in my life.
Now, just months after my lifesaving surgery, I'm healthy, living life to the max... and on a mission to help others prevent a similar ordeal by spreading the "pace" not "race" message.
Why do so many of us feel compassion and kindness toward others but then turn inward with a whip of self-criticism and perfectionism?
When just a few too many stressors decided to manifest in a week-and-a-half time span, I probably shouldn't have been surprised when my body decided to revolt.
What I've come to understand is that courage isn't the absence of fear at all. It's taking an action or risk, making a move or decision in spite of it, and here are some of the tools that I found were handy.
More often than not, we apply some emotional filter to our experiences and interactions, and these filters are a big part of what makes us stressed. It's not what happens to us that is inherently stressful, but how we respond to it that makes it stressful.