Strom Thurmond

William Barr, who has criticized federal prosecutors as “headhunters,” has encouraged DOJ to deploy rarely used statutes against violent protesters.
As Joe Biden considers a run for president, his long history in the Senate continues to come under scrutiny.
Southerners are downright feisty about their independence. There's a great sign at a park on the Alabama-Tennessee border which proclaims "We Dare Defend Our Rights!" Yet this rebellious streak doesn't seem to translate to independent candidates or third party challengers, who tend to fare poorly in Dixie.
Could this be the year when Republicans see some sort of replay of what the Democrats went through in 1968?
Are we witnessing the end of the Republican Party? That's a pretty stunning question to ask, but we're living through a pretty stunning presidential nomination fight, so it can no longer be avoided or ignored.
Either Sanders and Clinton will beat Trump. That will mean that America will be in a better place, ready to address many of our problems. But the residue of that presidential contest won't entirely disappear. Trump will emerge from his losing campaign as a man on a mission with a wounded ego and a large following.
The very concept has moved from the surreal to the possible. So it's time to actually think about what it would mean for the country and for the Republican Party.
Southern Democrats were more conservative than their peers elsewhere in the nation, but that wasn’t a huge issue until the
The battle over MLK Day moved a Super Bowl. Southern states weren't the last to celebrate it. The law making it a national holiday was signed by a Republican President. And you'll never guess who voted for it in the U.S. Senate!
Here's a quick lesson, it took 101 years after the Emancipation Proclamation to get a Civil Rights Bill to become law. Four years later Martin Luther King Jr., a leader of that Civil Rights movement, was assassinated.