student privacy

Sharing students’ criminal records with schools may violate their privacy, but some lawmakers think it will make teachers
As we all know, kids don't sit in corporate boardrooms and don't have the votes or economic power to make their voices heard. Yet, their success in life is absolutely essential to our nation's future. And when we stand up for all kids, we stand up for the best interests of our own kids
California has a long, well-deserved reputation as a center for public policy innovation. Now, California is driving the national discussion in another important policy area, as President Obama showed this week -- protecting the privacy of our students.
As technology transforms every facet of our lives, educators are implementing exciting new tools that will help our children learn the critical skills they need and prepare them for the 21st Century economy. California has taken the lead in ensuring these new innovations are incorporated into our classrooms in ways that protect student privacy.
We should commend Google for their apparent change of heart on the commercialization of our kids. But lingering questions still exist, especially those raised by privacy experts: what took Google so long and what is going to happen with the data Google has been collecting for the past seven years?
Educational software is big business. But these companies are not just competing in an $8 billion marketplace. They are being trusted with information about our children, and should be held to the highest standards to ensure our children's privacy and safety.
A whopping 89 percent of Americans reported they are "very" or "somewhat" concerned about "advertisers using personal data
Aimee Rogstad Guidera, executive director of the Data Quality Campaign, said the survey showed the focus has now shifted
Seven students were also found responsible for sexual misconduct in recent years. None of them were expelled. A 19-year-old
Once looked to as the starting place for imparting principles of freedom and democracy to future generations, America's classrooms are becoming little more than breeding grounds for compliant citizens.