student success act

A compromise bill was a long time coming.
My first thought was about the fate of the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA), the latest version of which is the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB).
Eight years after the nation's major education law expired, we might finally be getting a new one.
In July 2015, both House and Senate passed bills to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965. The House version is known as the Student Success Act (SSA); the Senate version is called the Every Child Achieves Act (ECAA) of 2015.
In the House version of the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965, the Student Success Act (SSA), parental opt-out is written into the legislation, bypassing any state positions on the issue:
However, the bill’s next steps are unclear, since even its supporters concede President Barack Obama is unlikely to sign
This week, both the House and the Senate are promoting their respective versions of the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965.
2. It Would Continue No Child Left Behind's Emphasis On Standardized Tests However, the bill still isn't perfect, according
House Republicans ironically named their No Child Left Behind reauthorization bill the Student Success Act, which attempts to gut our public education system and take vital funding away from the neediest students. This bill is paving the way for the privatization of education through the expansion of voucher programs.
Congress has the opportunity to invest in our nation's most valuable resource -- our youth. We need to write to our legislators to remind them of the original intent of ESEA and the need to ensure that our students get a world-class education that allows them to become contributing members of society.