students of color

"Black folks have been talking about this pain and suffering for a long time now, and the typical response is 'It's all in your head,'" one researcher said.
It should be noted that many of these detractors have not had to deal with the humiliations and onslaughts that have greeted these students on a daily and ongoing basis. One can only wonder how many of those who are denouncing these brave and courageous students would have the wherewithal and fortitude to withstand such mistreatment.
We know that Black students at Yale are underrepresented, as are Black faculty. We call on Yale University to enact the following steps in order to begin a process that mitigates against the individual and community damages caused by the racist structures of education.
Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs), though only accounting for 3.6 percent of all students, who pursue study abroad, support a disproportionate share of U.S. students of color that do so.
Two documentaries I saw recently got me thinking a lot about teaching, even though neither focuses on education: "Amy," about acclaimed British singer/songwriter Amy Winehouse, who died in 2011, and "Iverson," about 11-time NBA all-star and 2000-2001 Most Valuable Player, Allen Iverson.
In fall 2016, Jamillah will leave her Head Start classroom to begin kindergarten in a suburb of Washington, DC. Like many of her Head Start classmates, she is a tiny bundle of joy and curiosity; she loves colored pencils and books of all sorts, and adores singing the alphabet song.
I asked the kids how people they meet explain Elmont Memorial High School's high academic achievement, and they said, in one voice, "They think we're cheating." One student said, using words I would have hoped would never be used by a young person, "I feel we have to work harder and do better than other students just to get the same respect, because we're African-American."
At the end of last year, a group of SFUSD librarians created a “Teaching #BlackLivesMatter” online resource that compiles
For the first time in 13 years, the DOE now makes clear that states, school districts, and schools must make education resources equally available to all students without regard to race, color, or national origin. This is some of the unfinished business of the civil rights movement and a giant step forward for poor children, often children of color.
I'm excited about the work of our task force, which also looked at increasing diversity in our employee ranks and enhancing
As our nation begins to reexamine its social structure -- one, that for so long has been perceived to reward merit and hard work, but in actuality reproduces social class inequities -- a vision for a new educational landscape must include MSIs.
What is at stake in this case is critical because the Supreme Court's ruling will be applicable nationwide. If the ruling is upheld, universities across our nation will continue their efforts to increase diversity in enrollment.
If the challenge is successful, Fisher would reverse decades of legal precedent, stifling universities' ability to develop a diverse student body, and closing the door to equal opportunities for students of color. Not only would minority students lose, but so would our nation.
The study, which was conducted by researchers at the University of Southern California Rossier School of Education, followed
The note asked students to wear "African American attire" or animal print for a Black History Month event. When it surfaced
The proportion of students who are the focus of federal aid is growing. Thus, we should reconfirm our commitment to bringing about greater equity in education.
A major shift in the academic achievement of males -- and their prospects for a good life -- is occurring right before our eyes.
When high school graduates cross the stage and collect their diplomas, there are many people who helped to make that happen.
If colleges and universities competed not in athletics, but instead in college-completion rates, their rankings would look quite different.