students of color

"Black folks have been talking about this pain and suffering for a long time now, and the typical response is 'It's all in your head,'" one researcher said.
It should be noted that many of these detractors have not had to deal with the humiliations and onslaughts that have greeted these students on a daily and ongoing basis. One can only wonder how many of those who are denouncing these brave and courageous students would have the wherewithal and fortitude to withstand such mistreatment.
We know that Black students at Yale are underrepresented, as are Black faculty. We call on Yale University to enact the following steps in order to begin a process that mitigates against the individual and community damages caused by the racist structures of education.
Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs), though only accounting for 3.6 percent of all students, who pursue study abroad, support a disproportionate share of U.S. students of color that do so.
Two documentaries I saw recently got me thinking a lot about teaching, even though neither focuses on education: "Amy," about acclaimed British singer/songwriter Amy Winehouse, who died in 2011, and "Iverson," about 11-time NBA all-star and 2000-2001 Most Valuable Player, Allen Iverson.
In fall 2016, Jamillah will leave her Head Start classroom to begin kindergarten in a suburb of Washington, DC. Like many of her Head Start classmates, she is a tiny bundle of joy and curiosity; she loves colored pencils and books of all sorts, and adores singing the alphabet song.
I asked the kids how people they meet explain Elmont Memorial High School's high academic achievement, and they said, in one voice, "They think we're cheating." One student said, using words I would have hoped would never be used by a young person, "I feel we have to work harder and do better than other students just to get the same respect, because we're African-American."
“Students right now are growing up in a particularly unique time in that they are exposed to so much more outside of what
For the first time in 13 years, the DOE now makes clear that states, school districts, and schools must make education resources equally available to all students without regard to race, color, or national origin. This is some of the unfinished business of the civil rights movement and a giant step forward for poor children, often children of color.
At my community college in suburban Maryland, much of our conversation lately revolves around what students need -- what