stuxnet

See a clip from the "Going Clear" director's latest movie, "Zero Days."
What if someone infiltrated our nuclear command and control so that if we pushed the button, nothing happened? Or if something did happen even without our pushing the button? What if Pakistan did this to India, or India to Pakistan?
Despite the fact that cyber-attacks occur with greater frequency and intensity around the world, many either go unreported or are under-reported, leaving the public with a false sense of security about the threat they pose and the lives and property they impact.
In the future, what countries do with digital weapons may be more destructive than boots on the ground or drones in the sky.
The competitions designed by XPRIZE touch the furthest reaches of human achievement in fields like health care, oceanography and space exploration. We are currently designing a prize competition in the field of cybersecurity.
A spokeswoman for the NSA declined to comment for this story. The spy agency has previously declined to comment on the Stuxnet
In this three-part video series, you'll hear from some of the giants in the Internet and cyber security fields as they relate stories of cybercrime becoming a worldwide business, privacy becoming an antiquated idea, the discovery of Stuxnet and the real possibility of cyber warfare.
Does hacking into a private entertainment corporation's computer files constitute an act of war? Against whom, exactly?
Though autonomous, destructive robots are a long-time, hackneyed science fiction plot, for some time, this new kind of warfare has been shifting from yesterday's movie to today's reality.
Now, the U.S. military is creating teams of hackers to carry out those pre-emptive cyberattacks. And by disclosing that publicly