succulents

Watch how to turn an old book into an inventive planter with just a few supplies.
During the winter season, we start thinking about spring, and with that, comes gardening and planting. We flip through the latest garden magazines hoping that our backyards could be half as beautiful as the gardens in those glossy photos.
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Whether you forage or not, the trend of bringing nature and plants into the home is something you probably want to consider - and terrariums are a great way to do this.
One might think that as the subject of innumerable books, a Hollywood movie, and status as a feminist and artistic icon, there wouldn't be anything more to add to the conversation on Frida Kahlo. However, the recently opened exhibit at the New York Botanical Garden entitled, "Frida Kahlo: Art, Garden, Life" is proof to the opposite.
Perhaps there are plants best grown when you are young and free, or at the very least, in possession of a sunny exposure and a high, deep window ledge.
Before popping those empty food tins into the recycling bin this Thanksgiving, why not use them to create beautiful holiday gifts for your guests?
Here are some examples of thick-leaved succulents: If your terrarium is moist all the time, you may even want to consider
Are your needy, thirst-driven, water-demanding garden plants wilting beneath the sun's relentless rays like last night's limp, leftover linguini? Hang in there, pilgrim. There's a better solution.
Having an echeveria without soil gives you many benefits. Once the end has scabbed or sealed itself, you're able to place
In their ideal climate (zones 9-11), their large root isn't shown and stays hidden under the soil. In a container indoors
The Kalanchoe Blossfelckiana Cultivar 'Magic Bells', originally from Madagascar, is indeed magic and albeit quite alien when