sukkot

I didn't make it to synagogue that night. I couldn't. I spent the evening sitting on the floor, drinking wine, and weeping
Not long ago while working in our food bank, I noticed an older woman who seemed to be weighing her food before she put it in her basket. Each can, each piece of fruit, every vegetable.
Called simply "The Festival," Jewish history books record Sukkot as was one of the greatest festivals anywhere in the ancient world. Thousands of musicians, performance artists and dancers filled the streets of ancient Jerusalem. It was a spiritual Carnival.
Did you build an awesome sukkah this year? Send us your photos, as well!
Over the years, I've wondered why we need to stick with the dismal trappings of the kit sukkah. The metal structure itself is sturdy, comes in several sizes, and is easy to assemble. But why continue with the homely canvas cover?
The Jewish Feast of the Tabernacle, Sukkot, in 2015 began at sundown on Sunday, September 27, and ends at nightfall October
When I was a kid, Superman was the greatest of all superheroes. There were others with various powers, but Superman was the strongest, the fastest, the most complete. He didn't need gadgets, or scientific mishaps, or magical weapons to perform his heroic feats. His powers were inherent. He was superhuman.
India has just lost one of its most important Hindu leaders, Swami Dayananda Saraswati. The media referred to him by appeal to his most celebrated student, India's prime minister, Narendra Modi. But Dayananda did not need Modi to be known in India, and globally.
Jewish wisdom reminds us that knowledge is not significant if it doesn't engage, mobilize, and connect. Disinterested information doesn't constitute wisdom until it can inspire awe, deepen comprehension, and inspire transformation.
The commandment regarding the "four species" -- the lulav (palm, willow and myrtle) and etrog (citron) -- also comes from
Why do we head outside on Sukkot so soon after Yom Kippur?
The Talmud is one of Judaism's primary defining works. Why does it engage in such apparent whimsy alongside weightier and better-known matters like human dignity and God's role in our lives?
This week, the Jewish people celebrate the third holiday of the new year -- Sukkot. Following Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur, which are devoted to intense prayer, Sukkot is an extremely active holiday and, as such, is one which, by its very nature, promotes unity.
With the Festival of Sukkot, we mark a transition. The great gift that Judaism holds out to us it to be mindful of the phases of our lives, so that we don't rush through it, thoughtlessly, but we take a moment to step out of the rat race.
Once after eating a meal on our porch in the festive tent in which we celebrate the holiday of Sukkot, my then ten-year-old son announced that he was not so interested in saying the blessings after the meal.
The sukkah is a simple structure; it reminds us of the value of simplicity, of not getting overly caught up in the excesses of our lives.
The Jewish holiday of Sukkot is upon us, and university Hillels are celebrating with beautiful sukkahs, which are temporary
In the rhythm of Jewish time, the festival of Sukkot is known as "z'man simchateinu," or "season of our joy." On Sukkot, joy is halakhically mandated; we are not only invited to be joyful, we are obligated to do so.