Summer learning loss

Also referred to as "summer learning loss," here are ideas for making summer education more effective and accessible to students.
You'll be happy to know many kids already do some of these at home.
Through collaborative and independent processes, kids in the WRiTE BRAiN BOOKS craft original stories--including characters
Imagine if public schools left their libraries open during the summer for students to continue reading and exploring hands-on educational content. What would happen if media specialists remained on site so that students could check out books and access materials?
Summer doesn't have to mean learning loss. It can be a time of powerful learning for children if we ensure that there are
The summer reading list has provided students with a link to school during the dog days of vacation for decades. While it's important for students to read real literature during the summer -- wasn't Moby Dick on the list every year? -- the idea of a traditional book list today seems outdated and incomplete.
It's almost June which means soon signs will be popping up at all the busy intersections . . . you know the ones, the ones that demand you STOP SUMMER LEARNING LOSS.
As a child I hated not being allowed into the segregated library in my hometown. But I am honored and grateful that today the Marlboro County Public Library -- the Marian Wright Edelman Library in Bennettsville, SC -- provides a panoply of early childhood and adult literacy programs.
Spring is almost in full swing and summer is just around the corner. Millions of children in America can't wait for summer vacation, but for millions of poor children who rely on school meals it's a mixed blessing.
We live in a world filled with acronyms, and public education may be one of the worst offenders when it comes to a confusing alphabet soup of terms that only a portion of the population can understand.
If we continue to work together, we can ensure that more young people feel empowered to take an active role in making our communities better.
This phenomenon has been identified by researchers who have determined that elementary, middle and high school students actually lose ground on what they've learned in school during the summer months.
A new report suggests that when it comes to summer enrichment programs, the opportunities that might help slow that academic slide for struggling students are out of reach for many families.
How do we act on new information, when our systems and structures have been built on a foundation of incomplete or outdated information? How do we adjust what we've built in order to accommodate what we've learned?
We can stock our children's lives with stories and in this way, help them achieve academically and also inspire them deeply. Summer can be a transformational season for your child as a reader. Here are five ways to make sure this real-time magic happens.
While for many kids summer is long-awaited, for many parents it's long-feared. It's a time when low-income kids are losing ground and gaining weight rather then gaining ground and losing weight; a time when they are slipping down the summer slide.
Challenge yourself this summer by deciding to enrich your children so that they can return to school in the fall without having lost any academic ground. Here are a few tips that worked for me.
The question now is whether the city will be at the forefront of the growing momentum to advance a more comprehensive, community-led approach to educational improvement?
When school doors close for the summer months, studies show the learning gap widens drastically for kids from low-income families compared to their more advantaged peers.
All of our children have the right to a quality education and to learn every month of the year. Let us, this year in 2013, commit to every child across the country that we will bring their passions and interests to life.