sunday morning talk shows

“This is not a traditional president. He has unorthodox means," Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) said in defense of Trump.
Simply put, your circadian rhythm is your body's internal clock. Operating on a roughly 24-hour cycle, it governs our sleep-wake cycle and plays a large part in everything from hormone release to body temperature.
If there's one rule of thumb I would urge the world's Sunday-show producers to keep in mind, it would be this timeless piece
New York Magazine's Gabriel Sherman managed to get media observers all hot and bothered yesterday when he splashed a pretty
They're selling us another war on television. As a Washington media strategist, people ask me, "Who's offering alternatives to war on the Sunday morning news shows?"
As you may have noticed if you've been unfortunate enough to have tuned in to any TV coverage of American politics in the
All weather talk is good talk as far as I am concerned. It is also human talk. Checking the forecast on multiple platforms is an American pastime, but staying around to discuss the weather on any platform is a different thing altogether.
"Meet the Press" was the third place Sunday morning show for the fourth week in a row. The NBC News program fell once again
Is the United States a strong nation? There's a notion that it is, of course -- based mainly on the disruptive philosophical underpinnings upon which this country was established. But these are all really the fumes of nostalgia. What else is there? Well, we have the best fleet of aerial drone death-dealers in the world (for now). Certainly our fast-food accomplishments are second to none. And our Reality Teevee Industry remains one of the more successful and innovative welfare programs in the world, lifting individuals with no evident utility to the human race -- and who would quite likely be pushed into ditches to die in lesser nations -- into the warm embrace of the Fame Economy.
For years and years, anyone who tuned in to America's Sunday morning political chat shows was invited into a world of cloistered elites whose understanding of the impacts of public policy ended at the bank of the Potomac River. It was a realm in which a massive unemployment crisis that swept across post-crash America was only perceived to affect a group of affluent political celebrities and their electoral hopes. 'Will the terrible Senator What's-His-Nuts lose his ability to go on naming post offices after his cronies' children, or will he be forced to accept six-figure salaries on K Street or through meaningless board positions at useless foundations?'
Meet the third-place Sunday morning news show. Politico reported that 'Meet The Press' continued its ratings slide last week
Last week, Jonathan Bernstein, writing in Bloomberg View, issued a plea to America: stop watching the Sunday morning political
This week, the Congressional Budget Office has once again proven itself an able newsmaker, issuing a report scoring the economic impact of a proposal to raise the federal minimum wage from its current $7.25 per hour to $10.10 per hour. And once again, the CBO has produced a reality-based mixed bag.
this weeding out of the long-term unemployed is occurring because of some sort of blanket heuristic being applied to pools of job applicants, in which "long-term unemployed" is getting equated with "weakest candidate." Let's face it: Even when the job market has boomed, an applicant with a long gap in work history would likely draw some scrutiny.
A week after a massive chemical spill at a Freedom Industries storage facility contaminated the Elk River in West Virginia with 7,500 gallons of 4-methylcyclohexane methanol and forced 300,000 residents of the state to go without potable, usable water, life is slowly starting to return to normal. Well, that's the casual way of describing what's happening, anyway.
A week after a massive chemical spill at a Freedom Industries storage facility contaminated the Elk River in West Virginia with 7,500 gallons of 4-methylcyclohexane methanol and forced 300,000 residents of the state to go without potable, usable water, life is slowly starting to return to normal. Well, that's the casual way of describing what's happening, anyway.
Some 300,000 residents of West Virginia are without safe drinking water this weekend after 7,500 gallons of 4-methylcyclohexane methanol leaked into the Elk River.
And so on. I guess if you want coverage of a chemical spill, it better happen inside the bubble. Some 300,000 residents of
It's often argued that nothing needs to be fixed with the American health care system, because it is the best in the world. The argument I lay alongside that is that the best tasting menu -- at least according to Anthony Bourdain, a man with whom I wouldn't recommend you trifle -- is at French Laundry in Yountville, California.