sunni-shia divide

It is a tragic mistake to reverse Obama’s opening to Iran at the very moment it is bearing fruit.
I believe that even those who were deeply disappointed with the results of the election will sooner than later rise above the fray, put the nation's interests first, and work to build a more wholesome union.
To be sure, in Iran's conflict-ridden neighbourhood, the military instrument is critical to deterring would-be aggressors. The devastating 1980-1988 Iran-Iraq war taught Iranians this lesson at great cost in blood and national treasure.
Defeating ISIS demands an approach that is patient, highly sophisticated, and multi-pronged, one tightly focused on their vulnerabilities, and a thorough knowledge of the group's history, intentions, motivations and strategies.
We have yet to find any leader, and I challenge anyone to name one, who can rise to meet these awesome challenges we face today. A leader who stands above human frailty, shortcomings, and failings.
The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, which was once at the front and center of the Arab world and a significant player on the global stage due to its oil riches, has been steadily losing its regional influence and prominent role.
As long as the Sunni Iraqis do not know what the future has in store for them, they will be unwilling to make the necessary sacrifices to battle ISIS only to benefit the Shiite government in Baghdad, which they despise even more than ISIS.
The military landscape in Syria is sharply changing in favor of Bashar al-Assad's regime, the fall of which the Saudis vehemently seek.
The timely implementation of the Iran deal and Tehran's full compliance with its various provisions to date should not be viewed as just an accomplished goal, but as a continuing process that could take several years to determine its viability and the extent to which it impacts Iran's foreign and domestic policy.