super pacs

For some 2016 candidates, there was a lot of sharing during the campaign season -- more than ever before. It wasn't due to an epidemic of altruism, though; in fact, it might have been quite the reverse.
We also studied where the money was spent during the ad cycle of the general election. While Clinton launched her first general
It used to be a must-have accessory for any presidential campaign. Now, the deep-pocketed super PAC that is dedicated to supporting you, and only you, is more an integral part of a candidate's campaign machinery.
For those trying to secretly influence the election as the clock winds down, Oct. 20 was an important milestone. If a super PAC waited until then to register, it doesn't need to file any information about its donors with the FEC until 30 days after the election. Pretty smooth, eh?
We must eliminate the corrosive and corrupting influence of big money in politics, and restore the Democratic principles of our Founding Fathers.
In my job as a documentary maker, I am lucky to meet and get to know people from many different backgrounds who are kind enough to let me come into their world with my camera. They show me, and an audience of strangers, the things that are special to them in their bubble of lifestyle, politics, or worldview.
Total outside spending for the 2016 election has already reached a record $660 million, more than twice the $289 million spent by outside groups by this point in the 2012 election.
Hillary Clinton's critics claim that federal ethics laws were broken when her subordinates at the State Department arranged meetings and other favors for donors to the Bill and Hillary Clinton Foundation.
The Coalition said it is requesting "any document that indicates the type of visa applied for or issued to Melania Trump
If Clinton was bought by investment bankers, hedge fund managers and the like, we'd expect to see them donating in large numbers to her campaign committee; even though individual contributions to that account are limited to $2,700 for the primary and another $2,700 for the general election, they are a good measure of which parts of the economy are really drawn to a candidate.
Early on in his presidential bid, Donald Trump began touting his anti-establishment credentials. When it worked, he ran with it. It was a posture that proved pure gold in the Republican primaries. His actual relationship to the establishment is, however, complex in an opportunistic way.
When elections are for sale, you know who is most likely to win the auctions. You know how much less your votes and your views count. You know how cleverly sleazy the flattery will be that politicians send your way so as to obscure who really owns them.
Club for Growth had been one of the earliest backers of Cotton's campaign, and its own super PAC was spending heavily against Cotton's opponent, Mark Pryor.
Thank you for reawakening a wave of excitement within the Democratic Party. Thank you for championing a list of issues that I could heartily agree with, and for refusing to be distracted from your agenda by the usual mudslinging and other negative campaigning tactics so common in politics today.
If Simons and Mercer are in accord on any policy matters, they're probably few -- and are likely to be ones that affect Renaissance. The firm itself, after all, has spent millions of dollars lobbying Congress to change how the tax code treats hedge funds and their managers.
We keep reading Trump chastising politicians who are answerable only to their super pac donors. Although that is a terrible distortion of our democratic election, we should recall that it was imposed upon us by the 5/4 Supreme Court decision (dominated by Republicans) who decided corporations are people and can contribute unlimited funds to campaigns thru their disguised proxies, super pacs.
We are halfway through the 2016 national elections and the onslaught of political money from billionaires and multimillionaires will continue and increase. This is not the way our democracy is meant to work or the way our country is meant to be governed.
Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump has repeatedly trashed super PACs and claimed he would run as a candidate who couldn't be bought. Through the end of April, it looked like no one really wanted to try that anyway.