supercomputing

By Gary Grider Tucked in the foothills of the Jemez mountains in northern New Mexico, among the ponderosa pines and endless
Earthquakes pose a vital yet puzzling set of research questions that have confounded scientists for decades, but new ways of looking at seismic information and innovative laboratory experiments are offering tantalizing clues to what triggers earthquakes -- and when.
Cancer is the second leading cause of death worldwide, with approximately 14 million new cases and 8.2 million related deaths each year. A family history of cancer typically increases a person's risk of developing the disease, yet most cancer cases have no family history at all.
Both animal and human studies have shown that traits acquired by the parents, such as stress responses or the ability to
When researchers need to compare complex new genomes; or map new regions of the Arctic in high-resolution detail; or detect signs of dark matter; or make sense of massive amounts of fMRI data, they turn to the high-performance computing and data analysis systems supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF).
There is no reason for the United States to yield its position as the world's leader in supercomputing. We cannot afford to take a back seat in computer technology to the Chinese, or to anyone else.
The potential impact of "data computing" cannot be overstated. Companies' ability to make data-driven decisions in real time is a trend that "has the potential to drive a radical transformation in research, innovation, and marketing."