supreme court contraception

The sequel to the 2014 case involves a group of religious nonprofits that don't want to sign a form.
But courts that have considered the issue since then have found that a compromise aimed at nonprofits with religious affiliations
But anti-abortion groups are still unsatisfied with the new rule because it requires employers to give their insurers' contact
The five justices' decision should remind us how important it is to engage men -- young as well as old -- in conversations about contraception.
2. The Affordable Care Act isn’t the only way to get contraception to women. Contraception mandate fans painted terrible
Just when we thought the rights of women, workers and minorities faced enough setbacks, it appears the nation's highest court has done it once again. The Supreme Court's majority has very clearly shown where its interests are -- and they are not with the people.
In Harris v. Quinn, the court ruled that certain government-funded employees -- in this case, home care workers paid through
Read the full transcript below: Justice Samuel Alito proposed a hypothetical of whether a Jewish or Muslim butcher would
I respect the rights of others, including for-profit employers, to have their own opinions. But that does not mean that bosses should have a role in a woman's decisions about her reproductive health. Like all health care decisions, any decision about contraception should be based on a woman's needs and her current health.
The U.S. Supreme Court announced on Tuesday that it will take up the question of whether a for-profit company can refuse to cover contraception for its employees because of religious objections.