supreme leader

The measures target Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and his office.
Like a buzzing mosquito that just won't go away, Gulbuddin Hekmatyar is back in the news. He sent a video from his unknown hideout in Pakistan, asking for reconciliation with Afghanistan's government and presenting himself as a peacemaker.
Men in the Hermit Kingdom have one choice when it comes to haircuts.
About 47 years ago, the motto "Fewer children, better life" penetrated deep into Iranians' homes and affected reproduction norms in the quest for a more comfortable lifestyle. The slogan was a major effort by the Pahlavi administration.
The New York Times points out that the late ruler's birthday, Feb. 16, will be recognized as "the Day of the Lodestar." North
Since early May 2011, charges of sorcery, witchcraft, and using supernatural powers to manipulate people and events for particular political ends have been leveled against Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.
For most Iranians, the Green Movement is what the international media is calling the massive mobilization to dismantle the Islamic Republic of Iran. The hope is that change will finally open the door to serious reform.
For some inexplicable reason, Mahmoud's latest charm offensive seems to be captivating some in the media who are caught up in his, umm, let's say, "witchcraft."
Despite the Supreme Leader's outright ban of the fire festival with a fatwa, Norooz, a New Year's celebration with pre-Islamic roots, will prevail in Iran.
This week, two more official accounts come out of Iran, confirming the extent of violence that is taking place in the country's detention centers.
Iran's supreme leader has said that he has no proof the leaders of the post-election violence in June were backed by foreign
This week, Mehdi Karroubi came under fire for stating what for decades has been public knowledge in Iran: The systematic rape of political prisoners as a means of permanently disabling them from society, let alone from political activity.
Powerful regime insiders have lost confidence in the Supreme Leader's ability to preserve what they had all built together. This domestic fault line has the potential to be devastating in its long term impact.
With growing resentment directed against Ali Khamenei by his own peers, how ironic would it be that the first political casualty of Iran's election dispute turned out to be the supreme leader and not Ahmadinejad?
This revolution, if that's what it is, can only come from the Iranian people. The US must remain on the sidelines; a spectator to what could be a game changer in the Middle East and beyond.
A recurring theme in many of the cleric's answers is his very strong belief that "foreign" Western powers, particularly England, are behind the current unrest in Tehran
Injustice and arrogance are powerful catalysts, aren't they?
How to respond to the Ayatollah is a particularly tricky question for Obama, because he has an unusual dual role to play: Inspirational global icon and president of the United States.
Out of 46.2 million eligible voters, a staggering 39 million came out to vote, making a strong, unequivocal statement: Iranians value democracy
The Iranian people can best celebrate Khamenei's 70th birthday by booting him and his cronies out of office.