susan g. komen

In 1995, there was no awareness of breast cancer in Bosnia. In fact, the way people perceived this disease was similar to the reality we faced in the United States when our organization was founded in 1982 - a shroud of shame, stigma and misinformation.
When women and men don't have access to high-quality cancer care, families are struggling to pay the bills because of outrageous medical expenses and biomedical research funding is at risk of being cut, we can't afford to be silent. We can make a much greater impact if we raise our voices to help others.
It's an honor to celebrate these women and countless others this month - the 28th annual Women's History month - who uncompromisingly pursued their passions and dreams, often in the face of criticism, stereotypes and stigma.
No matter the country or region, we have consistently learned through our work that conquering cancer is not only about research and therapies. It requires creative and innovative solutions to ensure that women and men everywhere have access to the advances that could save their lives.
President Obama's announcement of a cancer "Moonshot" - with Vice President Joe Biden at the controls - is sending positive shockwaves through the cancer community today. It is the right initiative, at the right time, with the right leader.
Through the chaos, one thing was undeniable: good people are everywhere you look. In the midst of devastation there were flowers, offering hope for a better tomorrow.
Nancy Brinker's determination to fulfill her promise to her dying sister to do something about breast cancer has changed the world. The passion, determination and persistence of women like Brinker have spawned new organizations, fought diseases, and led to the world being a better place for all.
We are gaining on this disease, and that's the good news for those who are impatient, like all of us who work every day to find the cures and help the people who need us.
Last month, when President Obama visited Kenya to participate in the Global Entrepreneurship Summit, he regrettably did not have the opportunity to visit the important region of southern Kenya to see firsthand how economic growth is fueled by partnerships.
Susan G. Komen made headlines in 2012 when it stopped providing breast cancer screening grants to Planned Parenthood at the