sustainable growth

Growth will return. It always does.
Ironically then, it could well have been the success of The Green Consumer Guide and the movement it launched that limited
Americans who understand the challenge of climate change had to be encouraged by the Paris summit where the nations of the globe, including the U.S., pledged to work together to dramatically reduce the burning of fossil fuels -- before it is too late to avoid disaster.
SEOUL -- Today, China has not only committed to capping emissions by 2030 and has invested more than $80 billion in renewable energy initiatives; it is expected after Paris to roll out its most far-reaching national plan for mitigating climate change, including a potential carbon tax as well as national emissions-trading schemes.
While Boston is rapidly becoming a hub of opportunity for some, the breadth of this financial instability exposes an inequality of opportunity that hurts both families and Boston's long-term economic prospects. If we want to begin to address inequality, we must ensure that families have the tools necessary to become economically resilient.
There is a story that persists around the developing world, to the detriment of families and entire economies: Women are being sidelined from economic progress because of limited access to financial services.
We tend to see growth as an unalloyed good, but an expanding body of evidence is now telling us to think again.
Eliminating discrimination against women is a strategy that will move global development progress forward. We will fail to achieve lasting positive change if women are excluded.
Unfortunately, we cannot just take down cities and rebuild them, add more capacity in public transports, or create more physical space. The only thing we can do is become better at how we manage them. And the way we do it is simply by predicting what will happen.
In the real world, economic growth means more economic activity, more population × consumption, more GDP. It means more greenhouse gas emissions, less biodiversity, and a growing ecological footprint.
What are we willing to do to make a difference? 7 billion people can do a lot. I think we just need the right incentives and systems to make doing the "right" thing easier and more affordable.
In the recent past, sugarcane growers and conservationists may have seemed unlikely allies. Today, however, some of Latin America's leading agricultural businesses understand that improving sustainability has a positive impact on their bottom line.
Is the future of sustainable growth in corporate America linked to how happy we are to go to our jobs every day? Tony Hsieh
Banks -- and the loans they provided in the run-up to the crisis -- are at the heart of Europe's problems today. Policies to promote deeper integration of Europe's banks should be part of the solution.