sweet briar college

During our conversation, I learned more about being a Weed Scientist and Dr. Schwartz's current position of Post-Doctoral
Our small towns are vibrant hubs for innovation and creative collaborations because we all need to pull together to tackle community issues.
Although the field of engineering offers women careers that are engaging and interesting, this career has not been a historically popular choice. Understanding why so few women consider a career in engineering is complex and hard to pin down.
Summer STEM camps provide girls with an opportunity to experience the fascinating world of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). For girls new to STEM, summer programs provide a fun way to explore unfamiliar subjects -- potentially discovering new areas of interest.
"Now I think the interest in Sweet Briar is that everyone is rooting for them to see if they can actually make it, given this new lease on life."
A new school year will start in a few weeks. All over the country, first-year students will be arriving on campus to start an important new chapter of their lives and returning students will be remaking some aspects of their collegiate lives while continuing others.
With the closing of two more private not-for-profit colleges in recent months, many more college leaders and boards across the country realize they must take the difficult steps required to ensure survival for their institutions.
It is said that a liberal arts degree prepares one for life, and it is applying those skills that allows us to compete successfully in business. The confidence that we earn in a women's higher education setting further positions us for leadership roles on the business front and in the board room.
As I was saying before my house and entire family was frozen into a block of ice for two months, there are solutions to the problems I've been describing over the last several months regarding why college costs so freaking much.
That fiscally anxious Sweet Briar College, in rural Virginia, will close demonstrates the challenges facing liberal (in the nonpolitical sense) higher education in our harsher, more competitive times.
While what a film does matters as much as how it is made, the richness of film study is found in a dialogue between the two, a dialogue formal film studies fosters and explores.
When tiny Sweet Briar College announced its closing, it was front page news. It was heralded as the beginning of the end for liberal arts colleges and single sex schools. But when the large Corinthian College system closed campuses across the country, it did not receive the same level of attention.
While in the end every school must be a good steward of its resources, a society in which any college is largely interchangeable with another will be a poorer one, and the closure of schools like Sweet Briar College moves us further in that direction.
The recent decision by the board of trustees to close Sweet Briar College raises an important question: Is there a better way to coordinate the findings of ratings groups to assist colleges and universities going forward?
Educating women is essential to alleviating poverty, fostering economic development, improving the health and education of children. Women's colleges have long served as gateways for educational and economic opportunity for women.
Colleges close and merge, but that this happened so quickly to a school of such standing was a disturbance of a different dimension. If Sweet Briar was a glimpse of one future for higher education, I got a look at an alternate future in Oakland.
The decision by the Board of Trustees of Sweet Briar College to close its doors on August 25 shocked the American higher education community.
Sweet Briar College, which opened in 1906, announced Tuesday it will close indefinitely at the end of the academic year because of “insurmountable financial challenges.”
On December 6, 2014, thanks to live-stream technology, I enjoyed the 88th Annual Spelman‒Morehouse Christmas Carol Concert from the comfort of my abode. I was not disappointed.
There's something about college traditions that I find appealing. Perhaps it's because past experience has shown me that the traditions celebrated at women's colleges foster community, school spirit, empowerment and sisterhood while cementing life-long friendships.