sweeteners

The multimillion dollar trial started Tuesday.
The good news is that when you start to eat less sugar your body will stop craving it. I suggest you don't try to change everything at once, just slowly add one good habit at a time and you'll notice that the bad habits go away.
Stevia can be purchased in liquid and powdered concentrates. The sweetener comes in drops, like the vanilla extract you use
While I agree with the Sugar Association's Dr. Charles Baker in his recent blog that we should approach the obesity epidemic armed with knowledge, it appears the only thing the Sugar Association wants to do is exonerate its product and cast blame on other sweeteners.
When critics surreptitiously lump high fructose corn syrup into their attacks against "sugar" in an effort to make the attacks seem more potent, a serious disservice is done.
Dr. Joseph R. Vasselli, Ph.D., a research associate at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center and an instructor at Columbia
A century ago, sweets got their treacly punch from ingredients like honey, molasses or even table sugar. Today, a glance
Beverage Daily tweeted a picture of the drink earlier this week: Experts, however, question if soft drinks made with stevia
I looked at the science behind four of these popular sweeteners to determine which ones you can safely incorporate into your diet and which ones need to go the way of those nasty artificial sweeteners.
Sweeteners condition our taste buds to want more sweet. Consuming excessive amounts of sugar triggers your brain and body to want sugar most of the time. If your blood sugar dips down, your body gets a signal to eat more sugar. It's almost as if your system has been hijacked.
A group of food companies has filed a lawsuit against the Sugar Association, a trade group representing the sugar industry, for making false claims in advertising that allegedly caused loss of profit and other damages.
Taking a crop high in arsenic and concentrating it down into a syrup and then putting that into baby formula sounds like a terrorist plot on a TV drama. Unfortunately, it's actually happening.
Even if we were to isolate sugar as public health enemy number one, its regulation would draw us into challenging subtleties.
I love foods that are sweet-and-sour, sweet-and-salty, or just plain sweet. From sugar in baked goods to honey in my cranberry sauce and tea, sweeteners are an important part of my pantry.
Ditching that regular soda and switching to a diet version may not be the perfect fix-it healthy solution. Research shows that both versions may lead to disease.
Concerned scientists and researchers fought and were successful in keeping aspartame out of the food supply for over 10 years, and many of those still alive continue to speak out against it today.
Many clients I see in my practice have come to believe that artificial sweeteners are a healthier way to satisfy their cravings for sweet. Unfortunately, they're not.
It's hard to believe such a hazardous chemical would be allowed into the food supply, but it was, and it has been wreaking silent havoc with people's health for the past 30 years.
Sugar need not be the devil in the food industry; there is a good reason our bodies crave it. But when we saturate ourselves with anything, physically or mentally, we become dependent on it.