synod on the family

On March 13th, Pope Francis begins his fourth year as bishop of Rome, and pastor to the world. His first three years have been riveting in many ways, drawing an exceptional amount of attention, even for a media-saturated age.
ROME -- Reform of the Vatican, outreach to divorced couples, the jubilee and several trips overseas are on the schedule as Pope Francis' pontificate enters its fourth year.
Subtle, yes, like a trim tab, but Pope Francis last week steered the massive heft of the Holy Roman Church, the oldest continuous institution in our midst, toward the Gospel message of mercy for all. I believe it just may be that, at least so far as he can direct it, the church is once again working for the Lord. Amen.
Compassion and critical thinking are values we share with morally-sensitive secular humanists and with good people in every religious tradition globally. These values are equally central to the very best of Catholic tradition, not a threat to its survival.
No one -- including Catholic leaders -- want to return to the days when homosexuals were feared and stigmatized. It was a time when homosexuality was viewed as a problem so profound that it affected the total personality.
The synod had "laid bare the closed hearts which frequently hide even behind the Church's teachings or good intentions, in order to sit in the chair of Moses and judge.
The Catholic Synod on the family ends this week with many unanswered questions on how the church is going to meet the challenges facing families today.
The synod on the family is shedding light on some internal discord.
Quebec Archbishop Paul-Andre Durocher is suggesting that women should be ordained as deacons.
Autumn is a lovely time to visit the nation's capital. Here I look at contrasting visits by two prominent faith leaders.
Pope Francis has inaugurated the Extraordinary General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops on the Family. The three-week gathering of bishops from around will focus on married couples, parents and family.
"[Gay people] are our sons and daughters and brothers and sisters and neighbors and colleagues."
VATICAN CITY (AP) — Pope Francis on Monday told a contentious gathering of the world's bishops on family issues to put aside
One researcher was "struck by the high level of dissent” from church teachings by Catholics. Still, they remain loyal to the church.