synthetic biology

By Drs. David Niesel and Norbert Herzog, Medical Discovery News We live in a wondrous time. We can 3D print almost anything
"Consumers should be able to tell the difference on a label between stevia from leaf and steviol glycosides produced through
1. Organic Electronics Credit You've heard that "you are what you eat," but the emerging study of nutrigenomics is taking
Dr. Venter is a biology guru. Not only his team, together with the US government, was the first to sequence the human genome, but (in 2010) they had managed to create what had been called the first synthetic life form.
MIT biologists are reprogramming gut bacteria as "live therapeutics."
To answer these questions, my team and I set out to talk to creators of humanity's future, people working with our emerging
The latest term buzzing around the food world is one you're not likely to know: synthetic biology, or "synbio." Grist calls it "the next front in the never-ending GMO war." So while we're still figuring out what to make of GMOs, farmers, food suppliers and chefs should start to get to know this new method for developing foods.
Animal gene editing is being used to create miniature pigs, cows without horns and hairier cashmere goats. Plastic surgery might eventually extend to the molecular domain, changing us from the inside out. The scientists in this movement stand to become some of the wealthiest scientist-entrepreneurs in history, depending on the outcome of patent wars. But there could be immense unforeseen consequences.
We are sequencing the world -- from ourselves to all of the organisms upon which we depend as a living planet. In the future, our planetary genome might include new life forms built in the lab; there is even talk of the possibility of a resurrected Neanderthal, carried by a surrogate human mother. Science fiction? Not anymore.
An interview with genome and synthetic life scientist J. Craig Venter.
Synbio is a broad and quickly expanding community, and the examples I selected are only a few of the major amazing applications developed in recent years. I encourage everyone to expand his/her knowledge and make your own little research into this amazing broad new world of science.
In an industry notorious for transience, flux and experimentation, it's counterintuitive to consider that the fashion system is stuck in a rut when it comes to materials and real sustainability.
Synthetic biology will be the future of manufacturing, engineering and medicine. But for now, there's nothing wrong with focusing on start-ups that will generate revenue while moving up the complexity curve faster and more predictably than anyone else.
The beauty of fashion objects often stand in harsh contrast to the ugliness of how they're made. And that ugliness is avidly avoided, intentionally hidden beneath layers of expensive marketing, or -- in the case of something like fur -- transformed into a transgressive indulgence.
“One of our goals is to use this method to provide personalized medicine to patients,” Dr. Nenad Bursac, a professor of biomedical
Austen Heinz of Cambrian Genomics has been trolling hard lately. That is, he's been spouting provocative opinions to get attention. And it seems to be working, from his point of view.
There's nothing inspiring or empowering about two male CEOs taking credit for a young woman's work while twisting the entire purpose from being about reproductive health to being little more than a joke. But a 20-year-old ultrafeminist scientist who's about to launch her own company? That will be something to watch.