Synthetic Drugs

Other young people are not so lucky. Bath salts and other synthetic -- or "designer" -- drugs can have serious health effects including nausea, seizures, agitation, high blood pressure, heart attacks and drug-induced psychosis -- even death.
It's a rare day when the prohibitionist establishment and die-hard drug policy reformers are in agreement -- but that happens to be the case more often than not when it comes to what the U.S. insists on calling "synthetic drugs."
While alarmist media stories have focused on their reported dangers, what often goes unaddressed is that our existing pattern of banning drugs drives the creation of these new substances.
Fitzgerald, a junior at Woodbury High School, was found unresponsive on January 11, after a slumber party at her home. The
Among his own, Sasha Shulgin, who died on Monday, will always be remembered and revered as one of the greatest shamans of modern times. Certainly more scientist than psychonaut; he was crudely dubbed "the godfather of ecstasy," but he was far beyond that.
"She was not a big party girl," Hedahl said. "She was a leader, witty, with a sense of humor." Fitzgerald, a junior at Woodbury
Patients ranged from teens to individuals in their mid-50s, doctors told the station. Some of them were so sick that they
Police in Florida believe a teen who carried out a bizarre and violent attack on his neighbor might have been under the influence of synthetic drugs.
"The suspect told him he was going to eat his eyes," police spokesman Mike Puetz said, according to the Tampa Bay Times. Sorace
“We rigorously looked for those and didn’t come up with anything,” senior study author W. Scott Burgin said. “To the best