syringe exchange

Last month Congressional Republicans rallied behind an effort to lift a decades-old ban against federal funding for syringe exchange programs.
Some people were surprised when West Virginia became one of the first Southern states to operate an above-ground syringe exchange program. But for Jim Johnson, now retired Chief of Police for Huntington, West Virginia, syringe exchange was a common sense solution to an increasingly complex problem.
Sex workers are recognized by the World Health Organization, along with other major health and human rights organizations, as one of four key populations in the global fight against HIV/AIDS.
The good news is that for decades, both injection drug users and doctors have been advocating for harm reduction, a rational and proven way to reduce infections. The idea is simple: lower the risks associated with using drugs.
It's important for communities to understand that you can't just open a syringe exchange and expect people to come; you have to build up trust. The most successful programs protect confidentiality by avoiding the collection of names or other identifying information.
In 2010, when the Affordable Care Act was signed into law, we knew that new opportunities were emerging for drug users who were disconnected from the traditional healthcare system.
JM: This bill will allocate money for substance use treatment, including in jails. It allows first responders and school
A great way to raise awareness about the need for syringe access and biohazard collection is to organize clean-up events to pick up used syringes from public areas. In addition to removing hazardous materials from public spaces, where they could harm children and the public, syringe clean-up events are an opportunity to engage law enforcement on the issue of syringe access.
Advocates for drug policy reform are doing some admirable work at the state level to improve the health and dignity of people who use drugs. But things are rolling at the federal level too. The Harm Reduction Coalition discussed the issues they are working on.