Table Manners

Etiquette experts explain how today's culture has allowed our manners to go to pot.
The politeness that would make a real difference in my life, and I suspect a lot of people's, wouldn't come via the USPS or through the other Buzzfeed suggestions. It would be on the road.
The candidate was ideal for the role. In the post-interview debrief of the lunch, the CEO's only con was that she did not "at least offer" to help with the bill. I asked if he (the interviewer) had invited her (the applicant) to lunch, and he was still baffled.
How can my fingers, which perform so competently in many other situations, fail me so thoroughly when I try to manipulate two simple slivers of wood? I stare at my fingers and they look so normal, so functional. Why can't I do this?
when a friend challenged me to write down my 'Top 10 List of Pet Peeves,' I thought I'd struggle to come up with 10. I was so wrong. I've got 10. I could even get to 11. I could probably get to 'eleven-teen,' the mythical number my son uses when counting.
Engage in appropriate dinner conversation. That means avoiding sex, politics and the boil you just had removed from your butt.
It's so emotionally charged, this idea of making dinner. "Good moms" cook dinner, right? But when you don't feel appreciated in your own home, by your own people, it's so discouraging.
There should be 12-step programs for folks like me. "Hi! I'm Roz! I don't like to share my food!" We'll all get together and work on not wincing when friends eat from our plates. We'll learn to say, "Help yourself!" instead of "Hell, no!" when you ask us for a taste.
Say no and you're a killjoy. But say yes and you've given the entire table the go-ahead to share your sirloin. I just want to enjoy my own dinner. All of it. I don't like to share my food. Is that so terrible?
In an effort to fit as many people as possible into an oftentimes small space, restaurants oftentimes seat parties so close to each other that there's high potential for that one inconsiderate banquette-mate to spoil a meal for everyone.
Though I'm not for expelling children from decidedly mature European playgrounds, I am in favor of kid-free dining. What is one family's easily ignorable background chatter (ie: kids being kids) is another's theater of the absurd.
Gauge your food selection according to your table mate; if they order soup and salad, it's not in your best interest to order steak and potatoes, with a side order of creamed corn.
New Year's Eve is almost here, and many of us will be in charge of heralding in the New Year with a compulsory toast. Before you spend one more moment of time worrying about how you'll propose a toast, follow these tips and start the New Year off on the right foot.
These adorable animals want to make sure you don't embarrass grandma this Thanksgiving.
Here are a few holiday table etiquette questions to start off the season on the right foot.
Nope, I'm not writing about military service. I have come to strongly believe that we would, in fact, live in a better, kinder world if every teenager took a job in the service industry before entering adulthood.
I envisioned love interests in their distant futures saying, "He seemed nice, but the way he ate grossed me out," or future co-workers always "too busy" to grab lunch. So that's how my 11-year-old ended up wearing a suit and tie and attending a monthly etiquette class.
We're not sticklers for etiquette, but we are committed to the enjoyment of our eating experience.
This year, instead of the usual resolutions, why not make gathering the family around the dining table -- working on manners and proper eating etiquette -- top of the list?