Tales of the City

Based on Armistead Maupin's beloved novels, the series also stars Olympia Dukakis and reflects modern-day San Francisco.
This modern take on Armistead Maupin's classic novels features Laura Linney and Olympia Dukakis reprising their roles from an earlier TV adaptation.
A musical version of the wild, queer-inclusive classic will benefit LGBTQ youth.
When he was 16-years-old and on vacation in Florida, Brad Cerenzia met a cute boy at Disney World, fooled around with him in the dark on the Haunted Mansion ride, drove to a swamp for some fulfilling sex, and knew that he never wanted to go back into the closet ever again.
No less than legendary gay writer Armistead Maupin suggested that I read These Things Happen by Richard Kramer. When Mr. Maupin suggests, you read. I was quite simply blown away.
Finished binge-watching "Orange is the New Black?" Staring at your empty DVR counting the days until the season premiere
After more than 40 years here, Armistead Maupin packing up his Labradoodle and moving to Santa Fe with his husband. And I'm staying in town, left with nothing but a stack of his dusty books from the Chinatown library, five years' worth of late fees, and dozens of unanswered interview requests to both his agent and his personal email address.
In a desperate attempt to feel relevant in an increasingly digital universe, the regional theater has all but abandoned its alternative stance and now actively pursues commercial success and a presence in New York.
These are certainly wonderful times for Armistead Maupin -- and imagine the tales he'll be telling a year from now.
For many young LGBT men and women, Tales of the City opened up a window onto a whole new world of possibilities for them to consider. If Mary Ann Singleton could leave Cleveland and reinvent herself in San Francisco, so could they.
The Scissor Sisters are huge around the world, but in the United States, it seems like they're still a breaking act, and I kind of don't understand that.