tanning beds

Even with everything we've learned, some of us are still being fooled into thinking our choices are safe, when really they are increasing our cancer risk.
We must keep sensationalism out of public policy, or suffer the fate of the boy who cried "Wolf."
Indoor tanning can have deadly consequences.
Heard the old joke that a doctor is "practicing" medicine? Sometimes it feels that way. Twenty years ago I noticed a large freckle on the back of my calf. It was new, larger than a pencil eraser and it worried me. I pointed it out to my dermatologist who said it was nothing.
The demands are great, and as a nation we must all be engaged in the process for less cancer. We can make new inroads on this disease so that the next generation will be looking forward to days of no cancer as opposed to more cancer. 
But leaders of the Republican-controlled legislature who sponsored this year's legislation pointed to a call last year by
Despite all the information available to the public about the hazards of sun tanning, especially that ultraviolet rays are a known cancer-causing agent, people still continue to tan. This has led many researchers to believe that factors besides lack of knowledge are driving some people to tan.
While you may like the way these summer beauty rituals look on you, they may be more damaging to your body than you realize. Here are just a few warm-weather fads that can cause more harm than good. They just might not be worth the consequences.
Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays and the resulting cellular damage is a leading risk factor for developing melanoma -- and that risk factor is something we can control and reduce.
The Sunshine State has more indoor tanning facilities than McDonald's restaurants, according to a new study. The research