tantrums

In the throes of your toddler’s rage, it’s perfectly healthy to wonder whether you’re observing normal childhood behavior
More questions: Family Relationships and Dynamics: How should children repay their parents? Parents: What is the most awkward
"Being there and doing nothing are two very different things.”
An open letter to the teenagers at the Great Mall parking lot, I’m that annoying person who took forever to drive out of
In some way or another, we are all a product of our raising. Everything from our childhood, and ways our parents did or didn't participate has resulted in who we are today.
It can be seen at any long grocery store line-up: the older brother starts pestering the younger sister who is asking the parent for the 27th time to please buy them that sugar-loaded treat. The parent is becoming increasingly exasperated.
If you have a child with autism, you'd understand the headline instantly. Your daily routine isn't about getting up, get dressed, eat breakfast, brush your teeth and be on your way to school or job. That's for everyone else.
While toddlers do have tantrums because they can't have or do what they want, I honestly believe they aren't driven by a desire to piss you off.
Think of it this way. Your child's resources have been completely used up by all of that sitting, managing, and missing. And they just plain old have nothing left.
You had a choice, you see, this morning in the sunshine at the park.