tap water

Thwarting the coronavirus means washing hands and staying hydrated. That's not easy for the 2 million Americans still without plumbing in 2020.
The environmental activist spoke out after reports the EPA may stop regulating two toxic chemicals seen in tap water.
"The message we want people to hear is that if you use the neti pot, you should not use tap water directly," a CDC expert said.
The whistleblower who exposed elevated blood lead levels in Flint children says the decision is premature.
Tap water is the best way to stay hydrated. But it's not so simple for some.
The European Union just banned two agricultural weed killers linked to infertility, reproductive problems, and fetal development - the first-ever EU ban on endocrine-disrupting pesticides. That's good news for Europeans. But what about Americans?
Tests began in the last week in December, and 26 sites out of about 4,000 showed the higher levels.
In Louisville, Kentucky, sand and gravel filtration and hundreds of daily tests ensure that even water from the not-so-untouched Ohio River flows from taps sweet and clean.
The HuffPost/YouGov poll was conducted Aug. 6-10 among 1,000 U.S. adults using a sample selected from YouGov's opt-in online
Because the pharmaceuticals register in such small amounts -- measured in parts per billion, in some cases -- health officials aren't worried about the risk to humans. But some are concerned about their effect on plants and wildlife, especially fish.
A simple policy change like the Soda Tax can help us waste less water, lower our GHG production, and lessen the pollution of our air, water and soil. It's a win-win-win: a win for the environment, a win for our children, and a win for our communities.
For those working diligently to promote tap water consumption, all is not lost.
"Cap the Tap" is a perfect example of the doublespeak that Big Food and Big Soda often employ. The carefully calculated veneer of wanting to be "part of the solution" and "offering choices" to consumers is negated by efforts like this one, which basically paints tap water as an enemy.
6. Most of the money bottled water companies spend is put towards not the water itself, but marketing and advertising. 5
Some thoughts for today: the bad news and good news for World Water Day. (First, I think every day should be World Water Day, not just March 22nd, but hey, that's just me.)
You can see how the strategy to expand its consumer base would sound good to Nestlé's investors. But wait a minute -- the company is blatantly marketing its products like bottled tap water and infant formula to the people who can least afford them?
Stand at your kitchen sink and fill up a glass of water from the tap. Can you guess where that water comes from? Or how far it traveled to get to your tap? What about how adequately -- or not -- the land at the source is protected?
Our national water challenges are part of a broader set of global water problems. Basic water services, including safe and affordable drinking water and sanitation, are still unavailable for between two and three billion people around the world.
Maybe the fact that our politicians drink bottled water and don't think anything about it helps to explain why they don't act to address the serious and growing threats to the nation's water resources.