tap water

Thwarting the coronavirus means washing hands and staying hydrated. That's not easy for the 2 million Americans still without plumbing in 2020.
The environmental activist spoke out after reports the EPA may stop regulating two toxic chemicals seen in tap water.
"The message we want people to hear is that if you use the neti pot, you should not use tap water directly," a CDC expert said.
The whistleblower who exposed elevated blood lead levels in Flint children says the decision is premature.
Tap water is the best way to stay hydrated. But it's not so simple for some.
The European Union just banned two agricultural weed killers linked to infertility, reproductive problems, and fetal development - the first-ever EU ban on endocrine-disrupting pesticides. That's good news for Europeans. But what about Americans?
Tests began in the last week in December, and 26 sites out of about 4,000 showed the higher levels.
In Louisville, Kentucky, sand and gravel filtration and hundreds of daily tests ensure that even water from the not-so-untouched Ohio River flows from taps sweet and clean.
The HuffPost/YouGov poll was conducted Aug. 6-10 among 1,000 U.S. adults using a sample selected from YouGov's opt-in online
Because the pharmaceuticals register in such small amounts -- measured in parts per billion, in some cases -- health officials aren't worried about the risk to humans. But some are concerned about their effect on plants and wildlife, especially fish.