Targeted Killings

Before the April 11 action, Black Lives Matter activists facilitated a retreat for about 100 Midwesterners who gather, annually
The scenario is as unrealistic as the torture 'ticking time bomb' scenario. Typically, targeted killing operations do not target suspected terrorists who wear explosives and are ready to bomb a shopping mall.
As the news broke on March 7, 2016, that U.S. drone strikes had killed 150 people in Somalia, the White House announced it will reveal, for the first time, the number of people killed by drones and manned airstrikes "outside areas of active hostilities" since 2009. This is a critical first step toward much-needed transparency. But it will not go far enough.
More than anything else, drone strikes actively work against the potential for just, lasting peace. The kind of peace that involves political stability, economic opportunity, and restorative justice is impossible to reconcile with global, endless drone wars.
To stand the test of time regardless of evolving technology, international law must "work" from all participants' standpoints, not just those nations which view themselves as most militarily powerful at the moment.
American exceptionalism reflects the belief that Americans are somehow better than everyone else. This view reared its head after the 2013 leak of a Department of Justice White Paper that describes circumstances under which the President can order the targeted killing of U.S. citizens.
Obama did not start the congressionally unauthorized drone wars in Pakistan, Yemen, and Somalia -- which because of this lack of legitimate authority are essentially murdering people without due process -- George W. Bush did. But Obama has accelerated the illegitimate killing.
NextGen spokesman Mike Casey told DeSmogBlog that NextGen also delivered a copy of the report to Carlos Pascual, Special
Perhaps the billion dollar question is whether allowing all countries to hold armed drones increases the likelihood of war or détente. A serious conversation about drones needs to start -- now.
Illegal U.S. drone strikes continue (the Long War Journal says there have been eight drones strikes in Yemen so far this year), but efforts to curb the use of killer drones have made remarkable headway this year.
President Obama was right when he said "democracy demands" that all wars must end. Last month, he reaffirmed he wants to move America "off a permanent war footing" in his State of the Union address. Now is the time for senior Pentagon officials to explain the steps they'll take to get us there.
Drones have their place, and in future wars might even become instrumental in massive assaults on enemy positions. Even so, a measured use of this technology should be the guiding rule by which a democracy abides.
Nearly 400 people from many countries came together to gather information, protest, and develop strategies to end targeted killing by combat drones. I found the most compelling presentations to be first-hand accounts by those victimized by U.S. drone attacks, and a former military intelligence analyst who helped choose targets for drone strikes.
Two of the attacks killed civilians indiscriminately in clear violation of the laws of war; the others may have targeted people who were not legitimate military objectives or caused disproportionate civilian deaths.
We will never get to the business of choosing a peaceful future until we declare war obsolete, and that will never happen until we are able to look squarely at what we ourselves have done as a nation over the years, and what we're doing right now.
For more than five years, Brandon Bryant worked for the Air Force, helping to operate some of the most controversial vehicles
What are some of those moves? The U.S. is continuing to use these things called signature strikes, where you don't necessarily