tate britain

Just in time to wake you from midsummer somnolence comes London Calling, a tightly-focused exhibition of six post-WWII, mostly London-based artists at the Getty. It is thrilling, and I say that knowing that hyperbole about art is at its possible zenith.
It's International Museum Day and I'm thinking how lucky I was growing up in Manhattan. My parents took me to art museums there on a regular basis from when I was very young.
In spite of the fact that he wants his paintings to be framed behind glass, they should not be understood only as visual objects but as multi sensorial ones that can be touched, smelled and tasted, very much like during love making.
As we turn to 2016, we resolve to do more traveling, with an eye to experiencing the most spectacular, awe-inspiring artworks on the planet.
In the art world, it seems 2015 was the year of the underdog. In and among the blockbusters and biennials, there were a great number of retrospectives devoted to artists who have long been under-rated, under-valued, and under-recognized for their achievements.
The demonstration coincides with the major climate summit in Paris.
I've seen the show twice, taking the better part of a day each time. Along with Vermeer and Van Gogh, Turner's one of my very favorite artists. The experience of this show rates as one of the aesthetic highlights of my life.
In a world drenched with 24/7 information, what's wrong with just experiencing art? Who says you have to "study up?" Going to a museum shouldn't feel like work or an assignment.
The show starts with a display of coins and medals that refers to the way Victorians wanted to appropriate Imperial Roman imagery. Visually these medals are disappointing and confusing.
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