tax dodging

While it may be perfectly legal, Ron Johnson's stake in the multimillion-dollar firm with one employee sure seems odd.
If you think the pharmaceutical industry has stolen all it can from the American people through its price gouging, think again. Even as they're pricing medications as high as the market can bear and beyond, drug corporations are getting big taxpayer subsidies and then dodging taxes on the resulting huge profits.
Now that new Treasury Department rules have effectively thwarted Pfizer's attempt to evade its U.S. tax obligations, it's time policymakers turned their attention to something far more common -- and even more damaging.
Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella will be sitting in the House gallery as an honored guest at the State of the Union (SOTU) address tonight. By all rights, he be should sitting before a Congressional committee instead, answering for his company's blatant tax avoidance.
It turns out that Sanders does have a detailed corporate tax plan to pay for his infrastructure plan. He introduced the plan as a Senate bill shortly before announcing his run for the Democratic nomination for President. It is called the Corporate Tax Dodging Prevention Act.
Global governance needs recalibrating so it works in the public interest of all the world's citizens - not just for the few.
Our loophole-ridden corporate tax code creates winners and losers. The winners are a narrow set of large multinationals that boast armies of tax lawyers and accountants, and the losers are average taxpayers and small business owners who are left to foot the bill.
Data in massive cache of leaked secret bank account files lift lid on questionable practices at subsidiary of one of world’s
It's not okay to steal just because one earns below the median income level. But as I watched "National Investigative Reporter" Jeff Rossen bear down on a soldier lucky to be earning one-fifth what he is, I wanted to know why this was the crime on which the Today show chose to focus.
Nations must have larger interests at heart than the narrow arbitrage interests of corporations that act like economic pirates. You can pay the ransom, but they'll still make you walk the plank