tax laws

Donald Trump promised to bring big changes to the taxes and it is the high time for him to think about those promises.
Individuals who don't own businesses spend tens of billions of dollars each year (in fees and time) filing taxes. Most of this is unnecessary. The government already has most of the information it asks us to provide. It knows what are wages are, how much interest we earn, and so on. It should provide the information it has on the right line of an electronic tax return it provides us or our accountant.
Last week, Amazon told its most loyal and supportive partners that the threat of paying state sales tax was too much for the online behemoth. And just like that, small independent entrepreneurs saw a revenue stream disappear.
First, there is denial. Then relief, and then possibly a nice refund after it's all said and done. We're talking about tax season, and it has arrived. It's also a good time to take care of other financial business, like maxing out an IRA or rolling over an old 401(k).
It’s getting closer to that time again — tax returns. It might seem mundane, but the IRS is shaking things up for 2015. Here’s a few things to look out for:
Besides the ACA, there are a few interesting changes that could affect you when you file that 2014 tax return next year.
The theme is legal tax-evasion -- by this country's very rich -- enabled and encouraged by both sides of the political aisle on Capitol Hill.
Now that summer is officially over and the fall season has arrived, most of us are looking ahead to cooler weather, the holiday season and spending time with family. But there's one thing many of us may not be thinking about but should be: taxes.
The first step that all seriously committed couples, same sex or heterosexual, should do is find a competent financial planner to help them plot out a well thought out strategy.
On December 31, 2013, the tax exemption for mortgage debt forgiveness expired, leaving financially struggling homeowners with a big return to file.