taxidermy

The Natural History Museum in London disqualified the image, which they previously named a winner, from its contest.
"In the museum world, we hear about curators discovering new species of dinosaurs, or something. In this case, we didn’t find an amazing dinosaur."
For those who've never seen a The Two-Horned Drouberhannis or a Goo-Goo-Eyed Tasmanian Wolghast in the flesh.
Nineteenth-century humans stared death directly in the face.
Above the grey, chimney-strewn rooftops, the sky is dusky indigo. Of the little darkened storefronts along the rue du Bac, only one remains lit. Monsieur Deyrolle's old taxidermy, the front door is ajar.
"Having Arthur, stuffed next to me, comforts me."
Photographer Lori Pond is curious about fear. Not a general sense of unease for foreboding; not mundane anxiety; not esoteric crises or arbitrary phobias -- but real, urgent, existential fear. The immediate kind that triggers the so-called Fight or Flight response.
One of my favorite things to do for lunch in Paris is something I call urban picnicking: Grabbing a baguette, a bottle of wine, and a couple of cheese wedges at a market and finding a scenic spot to indulge al-fresco style.
In Wild Kingdom, Campbell shows that as individuals, our dependency on technology blinds us to precipices and predators, to each other. We are living vicariously when we look at a diorama; we live vicariously -- and allow others to live vicariously -- through social media.
This macabre fixation with mounting and ornamenting animal cadavers seems shocking, morbid and downright disturbing. To understand Walter Potter's hobby, we need to examine it against the backdrop of his lifestyle in the mid-1800s.