teacher quality

Join me and globally renowned thought leaders including Sir Michael Barber (UK), Dr. Michael Block (U.S.), Dr. Leon Botstein
Student success is highly dependent upon teacher effectiveness. Teachers must nurture student curiosity, elevate expectations for all students, and in many cases, give students hope where there wasn't hope before. But, before that can happen, teachers must believe in themselves.
With both the U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate having approved the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), the successor to No Child Left Behind, Congress has clearly demonstrated that the success of school improvements depends largely on state leadership.
The adoption of college and career ready standards now invite the questions: How do teachers, students, and families know students are meeting these higher standards? What expectations have been communicated to teachers about what students should be able to do with what they have learned?
Education historian Diane Ravitch describes her blog as "A site to discuss better education for all." Apparently, however
The national focus on teaching quality is gradually giving rise to the emergence of authentic opportunities for teacher leadership.
Reformers act as if they believe that teaching is something you do in your twenties when you are idealistic and want to "give something back" -- and then you move on to a "real career" in some other sector.
Teachers are demonized as "failures" in the classroom. Fortunately for all of us, more and more are banding together as agents for justice by believing in the inherent capacity of all students, and seeking strategies and instructional pathways to improve student performance through professional development and collaborative learning.
If the United States is to continue as a world leader, we must lead the world in education. And to provide the highest quality education, we must attract the highest quality teachers.
Then there's the problem of Las Vegas' image of glitzy casinos and ersatz monuments. "We're selling a state as a great place
The mainstream media would have the American public believe that teachers are the problem with our public schools. That they are the witches conjuring up the destruction of America's competitive edge.
Much attention is paid to related topics such as teacher tenure, due process, salaries, and external factors such as poverty. But not nearly enough focus is paid to teacher education and what it really takes to prepare a truly excellent teacher for the challenges of today's classrooms.
As Albert Camus wrote, "Good intentions may do as much harm as malevolence if they lack understanding." Whatever Ms. Brown's intentions are, they lack an understanding of both the current landscape of teaching in high-needs schools and of educational research. It's time to get some facts straight.
Selection tools, once again, are built on research into which characteristics give teachers the greatest chance of positively
This aspect of school reform has been lurking around the edges for some time-- the notion that once we find the super-duper teachers, we could somehow shuffle everybody around and put the supery-duperest in front of the neediest students.
The Obama administration will announce plans on Monday to enforce a long-ignored federal mandate: a decade-old requirement that states give students of all ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds equal access to good teachers.
The No Child Left Behind Act includes language requiring states to "ensure that poor and minority students are not taught
"So I guess you just deny that there are any bad teachers at all." This is a popular retort to various forms of "Your system for evaluating teachers is a lousy system." It is a dumb retort. It is dumb in the same way the following exchanges are dumb.
You would think "Let's pay teachers more" would be a fairly straightforward proposal. We could raise state taxes or even use some of that free federal money that DC makes appear out of nowhere.
Teachers in the nation's 40 largest school districts came to school 94 percent of the time in the 2012-2013 school year, according