technology addiction

It starts innocently enough. My aunt wants to show photos from their recent vacation, my cousin is looking up the name of
Jay Shetty encourages us to consider the ways in which technology affects our personal lives.
Jay Shetty encourages us to consider the ways in which technology affects our personal lives.
Really, come on "physically fidgeting?" What are they, drugs addicts? Is it really that serious, could going without a hand
I was mad that my cell phone was locked in my car. I couldn't scroll Facebook or other social media. I couldn't check my email. I couldn't even call someone or text without asking to borrow a phone. Without my cell phone I felt like I was sitting in that restaurant stark naked and I didn't like it one bit.
By Yasmin Tayag That process is already underway. The immense database of autobiographical information we've created online
You hate the way it vibrates. It sits in your pocket, drumming up against you like a friend you don't know how to break up with. Bobbing up and down. An abscess. Churning against you. Everywhere you go.
If you find yourself being less present with live human beings, getting swept away by the technology tornado or just feeling ready to break up with technology so you can feel more connected with yourself and loved ones, then the following tips will help you get back online with life.
Child development experts continue to debate the iPad's potential to help and to harm.
We're a permanently lit, constantly over stimulated, and always connected without any connection culture.
Rule 1. Never use your phone as your alarm clock. We all know how it goes: once you're done dealing your standard wave of 20 snoozes, you flick off the alarm, and go straight to browsing: Instagram, email, videos of baby elephants.