teen girls

The best thing you can do for your teen girl is to let her figure out life on her own. Earlier this month, my daughter's
I was a teenager once, too. Back in the 80s. Before cell phones and Macbooks were things girls covered in RedBubble stickers and toted around 24/7. There were no selfies, or belfies, or Kardashians to take and post them. But we still felt the same pressure to fit in and measure up.
You might not remember this, but being a teen sucks. Yeah, you provide a roof over your daughter's head and food on the table, but she's a walking, talking hormonal sharknado who doesn't have a say in most of what happens to her.
Why are we so hellbent on not taking young women seriously?
With a presidential election fast approaching with candidates to potentially become the first female president, these findings are a bit concerning. Children are usually influenced by their parents and their surroundings. This means it might be time to check in on your own biases.
I could hear them marching up the stairs and down the hallway like a pack of amateur pageant queens, performing for each other. There were only titters or guffaws, no moderate laughs. Everything was "very" or "totally" or "literally," not simply as it was.
Aside from my cynicism, it's very apparent to me that society's propagation of true, unconditional love is affecting the way young girls are approaching romantic relationships.
Freshman Year means more freedom, more heartache and a bundle of new experiences. One experience I wasn't ready for (and am still feeling the ramifications of), was, and is, money.
We can teach our children there's a time and place for cocktail or beach attire without shaming girls for their bodies. And we need to teach and show boys that a girl's attire or presence at a party doesn't mean she's fair game.
Instead of pointing out who is or isn't "feminist enough," I think we should work together. We should have each other's backs. After all, we're stronger as a unit than we are when we're divided.