teens texting

There may actually be more numerous contacts between parents and teenagers but less actual communication. Instead of assuming
Helicopter Parent, Free Range Parent. These terms are so overused they're as thin as my cotton tee shirts have become. I consider myself on the continuum, somewhere between the extremes of ultra-permissive and overprotective. Somewhere sensible, somewhere kinda in the middle. You know, perfect.
I asked a group of my students to try the Birdwhistell/Goffman experiment a la 2015: for one day, instead of texting the messages they normally would send to their family and friends and classmates, they should call.
You want your tone to be open and concerned -- not angry and blaming, or shocked and horrified. And you don't want to start out by slapping on a bunch of restrictions. Social media may not seem important to you, but it can seem like life or death to teenagers.
If you want to make an impression today, put your phone away when you are at a social function. If someone invites you to dinner, focus on that person, not your phone. If you are invited to someone's home, leave your phone in the car and engage in some conversation.
Why can't we have a device-free drive? Or make a dinner reservation for one? Maybe it's our fear of being alone. Maybe the social dependency distracts us from who we really are. Or lets us mask our emotions.
Wake up, people. This needless incessant phone-to-phone contact is ruining relationships and not just romantic ones. Bottom line: Our children need a break.
What about today's texting toddlers who grow up thinking that lol is a word? Are we raising a generation of illiterates whose fuzzy spelling is the precursor of fuzzy thinking?
Texting is a huge part of the American teenagers' lexicon. Some savvy schools are starting to take advantage of this technology and how frequently teens use it.
I text with my kids because I want as many open channels of communication as I can have with them. But I've heard about too