televangelists

Our unhappiness with national politics should not cause us to give up hope. These days, most positive political activity is close to home, where communities actually improve when clergy, congregation members, and elected officials work together for the common good.
While I love going to the movies, I find myself even more interested in hearing people share their stories of where they have found heaven in this life -- especially in the midst of powerful struggles. Increasingly, I'm even feeling comfortable sharing my own. How about you?
When Paul Lalonde was in his early 20s, he would watch conservative televangelist Charles McVety on TV every Sunday evening. Needless to say, it rubbed him the wrong way.
From a theological perspective the problem with the prosperity gospel is not so much that it assumes that one's actions have miraculous or "supernatural" repercussions, even actions related to monetary exchange. The problem is, rather, the way in which it inverts a more "orthodox" logic.
John Oliver, proved his mettle with his remarkable expose of the -- ahem -- "seedy" side of faith: televangelists who are purveyors of the so-called Prosperity Gospel, reaping rich rewards by preying on the poor and the weak who are often literally seeking a lifeline in the church.
Right-wing televangelist Pat Robertson wants grieving parents to know that it's okay if their children die, because God was
“Told that wealth is a sign of God's grace and favor, followers strive for trappings of luxury they can little afford in
Among them appears to be gospel musician and author Kirk Franklin, who recently penned an op-ed piece for Patheos.com in
Creflo Dollar Ministries didn't immediately return requests for comment from The Huffington Post. "The G650 is the biggest