television news

Once upon a time, network news programs placed important issues of the day under the microscopes of Walter Cronkite, Huntley
Carolina Sarassa wrote that when she began investigating the disappearance of Debora Flores-Narvaez, the opening lyric from
Al Jazeera America had the ambition, if not the nerve, to think they could ask viewers to start a new viewing routine, precisely at a time when millions of established viewers were abandoning television, and younger consumers were defining themselves as having never paid a cable bill.
And does it really matter in the end? History -- particularly autobiography, where a lot of history comes from -- is often described by scholars as nothing more than distorted facts that are filtered through frail human memory to give meaning to the past. So maybe there is no "truth."
It would make perfect sense for Mad Men to win its record-setting fifth Best Drama Emmy. And it's high time for Jon Hamm, after eight nominations for his masterful performance as the iconic Don Draper, to finally take the Best Actor prize.
It's especially important for women to help women. We are often underpaid, underpromoted, objectified and belittled. We frequently apologize, tiptoe, accept less and work twice as hard.
Once upon a time, network television news was dignified, objective, and delivered in stentorian, voice-of-God tones by white, vaguely Protestant men, in half-hour increments at the dinner hour.
Mad Men began and ended with Don Draper in silhouette against an iconic backdrop. In the beginning, the richly cluttered urban canyons of Manhattan in the show's evocative opening titles. In the end, the seemingly limitless horizon of the Pacific Ocean.
While The BBC does not release its spending on election night coverage, The BBC apparently spends about £7m a day on making their programs. They don't make them cheap. We do know what the students at the University of Winchester spent on their election night coverage. £100. Now, clearly there is a major difference.
Don Draper has been shedding quite a few things this season. So it makes sense that he ends the penultimate episode in the epic novel for television that is Mad Men sitting alone on a bus stop in Oklahoma, heading west.
Suppose we were to aggregate all those newspaper videos into a daily news feed -- license it to networks around the world -- and then split the license feeds amongst the newspapers that contributed? A kind of video syndication. Would that work?
With just two episodes left after this one in the life of the series, most of the characters seem set in their trajectories, save for one. You can guess who that is.
Now, with only three episodes left in the series, Don is free to explore in next week's antepenultimate episode, "Lost Horizon," his own private paradise free of the shallowness and hypocrisy from which he's been becoming alienated. (
Television audiences are beyond loyal. Indeed, post-50s remember their favorite sitcoms with particular passion and nostalgia. Just the sound of those great TV theme songs brings us to our feet. So, veteran TV sitcom stars who made us laugh out loud, sit up and take notice. Millions of us watched you and loved you, so please come back and make us laugh out loud one more time.
Don Draper takes stock of the future, his own, his agency's, his family's, maybe even a bit of thought about the world.
In a sense, the title of the latest episode of Mad Men, "New Business," is a misnomer. For most of it concerns old business. Yet dispensing with old business as good a way as any to get on with the new, and this episode clears the decks of much that remains from the past.
Reality star Bethenny Frankel was put on the hot seat this week during an interview with Meredith Vieira.
The final episode of Craig Ferguson's 'The Late Late Show' is set for December 19th, and so are the guests.
Whether all these figures are anti-heroes, or in some cases something else entirely, is an interesting question. As is the question of why anti-heroes are so important in quality television. Short form answer is that they match the times. It's a mostly cynical and sour era, with little faith in institutions or, generally speaking, leaders.
Given that the show had seemed near played out when it ended its eight-season run four years ago, the question is why the longest-running espionage TV series in history seems still to have a lot of life left in it 13 years after it first ran.