Telluride Film Festival

Look out for an Obama doc, a Louis C.K. comedy and a slew of Oscar hopefuls.
"What we do to the mountains we do to ourselves," says the blocky handwritten text across the Native American activists Klee and Princess Benally, and on the face of it, you're bound to agree with this gently oblique environmental sentiment.
Telluride, best known for its world class ski resort, has in recent years become more popular as an off-season destination. Large numbers of visitors flock to the box canyon during the spring and fall, when there are fewer people and the town is quieter from closed seasonal businesses.
Festivals keep alive the communal experience of film viewing, considered an anachronism in the age of laptops and cell phones.
Venice. Telluride. Toronto. Film festival season is in full effect with Oscar buzz already reverberating across the air waves and the internet. Every year at this time, movie makers all across the globe reveal new big screen narratives that reflect on, shape and shift culture.
I have found over time that I actually prefer documentaries to fiction films. Why? From docs, I learn and am exposed to things that I did not know before: how somebody chose to live his or her life; historical events of which I was ignorant; issues that are happening today.
The Dardennes offer a fascinating glimpse of the human face when confronted up-close with a moral choice between compassion and self-interest.
The Telluride Film Festival offers a great span of cinema, from premiering Oscar contenders to silent-era black-and-white gems to small budget independents that will never play widely but may earn an enduring cult audience.
Who would ever guess that talking with Stewart and his merry band of pranksters was so dangerous? But following an interview with The Daily Show's Jason Jones, Newsweek correspondent Maziar Bahari paid the price.
Except, I don't know if I believe that. Not that "Birdman" isn't at the top of my most-anticipated list, nor that I think