Temple Grandin

When it comes to animal rights, convenience dictates our activism.
When I speak about growing up with autism to different organizations, schools and businesses, it’s often a surprise for people
His life might not be any of the things I dreamed for him when he was in the womb.
Every young girl who has owned a horse will tell you that horses are steadfast guardians of secrets whispered into necks and manes.
A few of us have been at this "'notable person on the spectrum writes book'-thing" for some time. And whether it's me, Temple Grandin, Liane Holliday Willey, Jerry Newport, John Elder Robison, or Donna Williams...etc. I'm going to guess that we all, as oldsters, see a tremendous number of young, next-gen spectrumites who are writing, or who are seeking to write books about what life is like on the autism spectrum.
2) Judicious use of vaccines makes sense. Don't overvaccinate and don't do all your vaccines in one appointment. Wait a few
Only two of these orgs have probably had any dealings with small businesses, and yet almost all of the reputable labor forecasts
Thorkil calls his approach the "dandelion model." "We call dandelions weed when they pop up in our lawn, but the spring greens
In a collection of six short stories he compiled and called "after the quake," Haruki Murakami describes the lives of six random people in the immediate aftermath of the 1995 earthquake that killed 6,434, injured 43,792, and displaced 310,000 citizens of the city of Kobe, Japan.
"Many kids on the autism spectrum love to build things with Legos. When I was little, if it could be made from paper, tape, and cardboard, it got built. At age three, I had no speech, but lots of therapy and excellent teachers helped me be successful."