tenure

As many point out that Xi's anti-corruption drive is carried out only for the establishment of one-party rule system, the
The department clearly understood the importance of Bahng's path-breaking work; they welcomed the intellectual "diversity" she provided. Yet even with this recognition by specialists, tenure was denied by the higher-ups.
Scott Walker pushed to eliminate tenure from state law. Professors are fearful about what's next.
Tenure is a remarkable institution that deserves active discussion of the kind Dr. McNutt's editorial has initiated. If maintained, it must be for its positive advantages, rather than due to inertia alone.
In general, at colleges/universities that are predominantly white, most, if not all of the Board of Trustee Members and Administrators, the people that actually oversee the President's management of an academic institution's finances and ensure that the institution has the capacity to fulfill its stated mission, are white.
Minorities often find themselves in this situation -- whether they work in academia or business or government. And they often have to think about the backlash of someone, quite often an ally, who will take offense if they don't tow the line.
Defending tenure should mean owning it without embarrassment -- and also pressing against those forces that tend to make it a source of embarrassment. Tenured and tenure-track faculty could do better in both respects.
Are elite college professors really overpaid? A few are, perhaps, but you have to ask: compared to whom? We've reached a point in this country where astronomical paydays are deemed acceptable as long as they occur in the private sector -- and merely decent earnings in the public sector are suspect.
MADISON, Wis. — The Legislature's budget-writing committee voted Friday to cut the University of Wisconsin's budget by $250
The thing voters need to ask themselves is: Who do they believe has the best interests of their child in mind more -- the person who interacts with them every day and is part of their local community, or the corporate CEO 500 miles away who answers to an unelected board and investors?
The Governor of New York is hoping to eliminate tenure. Oh, I know the newspapers refer to it as an overhaul but he is really hoping to give the school districts the power to terminate the employment of any teacher and he plans to begin this process by the smokescreen of some new teacher evaluation system.
I have opinions, and if you read my weekly blogs regularly you know that I do not hesitate to voice those opinions. But I am not opinionated. I like to think that I base my opinions on "evidence and good reason."
To far too many of those who are making the decisions in our nation's schools, teachers are interchangeable parts; one is just as good as another. If they weren't smart enough to get out of the classroom and get into a higher paying job, they deserve whatever they get.
Everything -- everything -- tells us that if our goal really is to put a great teacher in every classroom, reformsters, educational thought leaders, and rich unelected amateurs who somehow get to set education policy are going about it exactly backwards. The attacks on tenure are literally the exact opposite of what is needed.
Not all administrators support their teaching staff. Just like in the real world, sometimes the boss doesn't like a few of his or her workers. And without that support in a climate which already is pointing at teachers as the main problem with education, things can get a mite sticky in a hurry.
For most teachers I know, the debate is personal -- not just because it's about our jobs, but because as teachers who are always striving to do our best work for our students, we want and need to be surrounded by colleagues who help each other by doing excellent work, too.
When so called "reformers" like Campbell Brown try to make the case that tenure extends teachers an unfair guarantee of employment unlike other public servants, she is more than stretching the truth.
Perhaps Brown would be interested in knowing that charter schools, non-union schools and schools without tenure protections actually don't outperform their counterparts.
In short, if you're a tenured teacher, you are an impediment to Excellence. The only way you can help children is by getting rid of your tenure, standing up straight and walking to Arne Duncan in Washington DC and saying, "Please sir, I want to be fired for any reason."