Terrence Malick

In my career, I have had several pieces appear in movies, but for the life of me, I forget. Like all pleasures in life, glory
Here's a curious thing: A fun, funny, action-packed animated family film that just by happenstance strikes at the very core of the ugliness behind the presidential campaign of a certain, stubby-fingered, orange-American.
Terrence Malick is not known to deliver T&A in the style of banal Hollywood blockbusters that are the industry's bread and butter. Yet Malick's latest work asks us to indulge a visual narrative that does just that in order to arrive at what is presumably a noble space of redemption by film's end.
Can we vote with our spoon, every day of our lives? And if so, where can I sign up so I can avoid the mistake of electing some of the candidates running for office these days...
"You have love in you. I know it." That's the takeaway from the first trailer of Terrence Malick's "Knight of Cups," the
In Things People Do, an insurance man with an ideal middle-class set up loses his job because he is too "nice" when investigating insurance claims. And like the protagonist of Murnau's celebrated 1924 film The Last Laugh, Bill is too ashamed to let his family know.
Lynn Margulis' view of evolution focused more on what might be called the "environmental agency" of organisms -- their capacity to adapt their environment, not just adapt to it. Only when and if such a view of evolution becomes more widely accepted does society seem likely to fight warming successfully.
Godfrey Reggio makes the kind of movies I think Terrence Malick longs to make. While Malick has already rejected story and plot, as well as dialogue, character development and, occasionally, even characters, he's never made a film where he ignored all of these things completely.
Ain't Them Bodies Saints is meticulously constructed. With deft camerawork and a pure attention to 70s small town details, there is a fantastic, technically sound structure that director David Lowery has built.
So many films today seem to carry the same references to earlier work, indicating the influences that shaped the filmmaker in his work. But references are one thing; using those references for fresh inspiration is something else.
Screen Daily reports that Portman has long been interested in taking on the role of Lady Macbeth, an iconic Shakespearean
Over the years, I've developed what I refer to as the 20-minute rule. It basically says that a movie that hasn't hooked me in the first 20 minutes probably isn't going to.
Some critics loved To The Wonder, including the late Roger Ebert, but I didn't exactly love it. The film is undeniably beautiful, I'll give it that. But beauty alone does not make a good movie. Or even watchable, for that matter.
You know what an audience-friendly film is. It tells a story that engages you about characters you can like and root for. Yet those films -- movies that seek to tell a story that uplifts or inspires -- often get short shrift from critics for that reason alone.