Texaco

Experts worry that the growing market for high-tech night vision gear is a national security concern.
The sins of past presidents are visited on the present, and when presidents make poor decisions, the odious results can linger
What does superstar quarterback Tom Brady and a group of Ecuadorian indigenous tribes suing Chevron for massive oil contamination have in common?
President Roosevelt maintained a studied neutrality toward the Spanish Civil War that he would later regret. Texaco, on the other hand, went to war.
While individuals in influential positions like Brooks continue to scoff at the warnings of the scientific community and mock the sufferings of the public, the rest of the world, quite literally, burns.
Embrace your scars. When you have something to offer you'll be sought. The person who wants something least holds the stronger position. Living the dream is never giving in to adversity -- hold ground, then bounce back.
Seven years ago this month, I traveled to Ecuador's rainforest to learn about one of the world's largest environmental oil disasters. It was a life-changing trip.
Well over a million people have already viewed last week's video, and many told us that they were deeply affected by a resident named José describing how he lost three daughters due to the toxic contamination of his home.
Without fail, twice a year, I have a fond thought for a man I never had the pleasure of meeting. Those times: National Football League opening day and during the frenzy leading up to an American holiday called the Super Bowl.
Ignoring the evidence, the oil giant continues to tout the agreement as its "get-out-of-jail-free" card, and U.S. reporters continue to use it in their stories as a legitimate response to the Ecuadorians' charges.
Chevron has spent millions upon millions of dollars in an abusive "scorched earth" legal strategy to attack not only the villagers and their representatives who have held the company accountable in Ecuador, but virtually anyone who supports them.
The big news this week in the Chevron-Ecuador saga is the Patton Boggs settlement with the oil giant, which should not be shocking to anyone following the financial troubles of the law firm.
The U.S. needs to immediately hold him responsible for the welfare of two American citizens and demand verifiable information on their safety, or proof of their deaths and the return of their remains.
Christie's links to high-powered attorneys may stir uncomfortable memories for those who have been on the receiving end of the corporate stick in Latin America.
The Ecuadorian communities were the victims of exploitation by a multinational corporation, Texaco. Their lives, and that of their children, are affected by the toxic waters that leaked into water sources on which they are dependent. With their legal team on trial, who will pursue justice for the Ecuadorian plaintiffs now?
After 20 years of litigation in courts around the globe, the Ecuadorians remain twice victimized -- first by the exploitation of their environment, and now by the exploitation by both sides of a legal system ill equipped to deliver them justice.
The trial is the latest chapter in a dispute over environmental contamination between 1964 and 1992 at an oil field in northeastern
The question is whether the scales of justice will be as balanced as the news article, or whether Chevron's superior firepower will be able to overwhelm the gripping stories of those impacted.
Underneath the lush Ecuadorean rain forest lie some of the country's largest oil deposits, Ecuador's principal export and one of its most important sources of revenue -- a resource that has been both a blessing and a curse
The people of the Ecuadorian Amazon took on that struggle of a lifetime and yesterday the court made its decision -- Chevron is guilty.