Texaco

Experts worry that the growing market for high-tech night vision gear is a national security concern.
The sins of past presidents are visited on the present, and when presidents make poor decisions, the odious results can linger
What does superstar quarterback Tom Brady and a group of Ecuadorian indigenous tribes suing Chevron for massive oil contamination have in common?
President Roosevelt maintained a studied neutrality toward the Spanish Civil War that he would later regret. Texaco, on the other hand, went to war.
While individuals in influential positions like Brooks continue to scoff at the warnings of the scientific community and mock the sufferings of the public, the rest of the world, quite literally, burns.
Embrace your scars. When you have something to offer you'll be sought. The person who wants something least holds the stronger position. Living the dream is never giving in to adversity -- hold ground, then bounce back.
Seven years ago this month, I traveled to Ecuador's rainforest to learn about one of the world's largest environmental oil disasters. It was a life-changing trip.
Well over a million people have already viewed last week's video, and many told us that they were deeply affected by a resident named José describing how he lost three daughters due to the toxic contamination of his home.
Without fail, twice a year, I have a fond thought for a man I never had the pleasure of meeting. Those times: National Football League opening day and during the frenzy leading up to an American holiday called the Super Bowl.
Ignoring the evidence, the oil giant continues to tout the agreement as its "get-out-of-jail-free" card, and U.S. reporters continue to use it in their stories as a legitimate response to the Ecuadorians' charges.