thank you note

This weekend, a young woman asked me, “Do I really need to send a thank you note after my interview?” Let me be blunt: I
there are days when even the most dedicated people get run down and question their commitment. The next time you notice a good job, say something, do something and make something special out of an average day. What a great lesson we can teach our children.
As the person responsible for interviewing prospective employees for your company, what are your thoughts on thank you notes after the interview? Do you expect one, appreciate the effort, keep the note on file?
This is one communication that can only be done old school -- no emails or texts. It has to be on paper, in an envelope, and mailed. The experience of writing a thank you note does as much for the sender as the receiver.
You teach her about sentences, periods and question marks. At home, she draws pictures and labels them, sounding out each syllable of each word. A blanket of sentences and drawings cover our tables and floors.
The 42-year-old was pleased to hear that she created a healthy working environment for Islam, and said that she tries hard
There is a reason nearly everyone keeps the handwritten notes they've received in a shoebox or a special drawer in their desk. Have you ever heard of a shoebox that contains printed out thank-you emails? E-cards? I haven't.
Clearly, it's a win-win; the recipient feels good that his or her success or gesture of kindness is acknowledged, and it distinguishes the writer for having executive manners. Best of all, it's fast, easy and sends a powerful message.
It's noisy out there. Everyone wants to be noticed. Yet, so many people ignore this simple and easy tool that I guarantee will set you apart.
What super power do we need to thrive in this time of superlatives? You might guess extraordinary mental acuity or the ability to be in two places at the same time, but I think it's much simpler than this.