The Age of Innocence

Planning to teach Wharton soon, I took another look at Franzen's New Yorker hatchet job on Edith Wharton, and it was worse than I remembered. The critics' darling praises her classics The House of Mirth, The Custom of the Country, and The Age of Innocence but grossly misreads her character and her life.
Edith Wharton is not a writer you tend to think of on Valentine's day. Her marriage was unhappy and the affair she had in her forties was with a faithless cad (it was a secret until the 1970s).
Don't you just love movies about steamy love affairs? Period pieces that chronicle sexy liaisons are the best, with all of those amazingly elaborate costumes in the mix. So many layers of fancy gowns, corsets and billowy undergarments to wade through in the heat of the moment!
What is it about Edith Wharton and her work that is so timeless? Why are we still reading, relating and retelling her vivid stories?
Nobody's expecting Wharton to ever be as popular as Jane Austen. After all, Wharton had a much more jaundiced view of life than Austen did, and she's unlikely to be hijacked as a writer of romances, the way Austen has been.
I first moved to New York City in 1996, and I have no need or desire to live anywhere else in the world. After living in
Lolita. Light of my life. Lo. Li. Ta Very Much. If you wonder where my peculiar interests came from, I should have to say
Shutter Island pushes our conception of Scorsese to the brink. It tests him, proving that he has what it takes to navigate through the film's several time frames and planes of consciousness.
Though we have elevated women to prime political positions, the media has cast female politicians in an odd, almost asexual maternal role. They're not allowed to wander off the territory.