Only after living in South Africa have I been able to truly humanize my understanding of America's, and therefore my own, discrimination. For the first time, I see the greatness of the American dream clearly: deflated by moral contradiction.
My Facebook feed is full of people who have the most awesome jobs they have ever worked, who eat at the most amazing brunch spots ever to wield spatulas and pour pancake batter and who experience exhilaration and inspiration everyday. It's all faux-inspirational quotes and self-aggrandizement.
The protests for "Ferguson" and Staten Island have not been about single incidents of one black man getting killed by one (white) police officer. They are about institutional racism in the United States, and about excessive use of police force that ends only in its most visible and extreme form.
I will always tell them that Fitzgerald's novel is a poem disguised as a novel. Much of the novel should be treated more as poetry with its own sets of rules and less like a novel.
Once upon a time a truly great country existed -- this nation was by far the greatest land in the whole wide world -- its laws promised liberty, freedom and justice for all.