the bluest eye

Toni Morrison is a Nobel and Pulitzer Prize-winning writer whose novels like “Beloved” unapologetically depict the African-American experience. #BlackGlory #BlackHistoryMonth
Looking for some great beach reads by women? Revisit these classics: Charlotte Perkins Gilman's The Yellow Wallpaper (1892); Kate Chopin's The Awakening (1899); and Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye (1970). All three books challenge contemporary thought for the time periods in which they were written.
Is self-loathing -- or at least stark, scathing self-criticism -- a required personality trait for novelists? Well, it's certainly a useful tool for probing the depths of human possibility. Here are ten examples of bestselling novels whose characters struggle with low self-esteem.
Searching for home -- for a safe place to rest your head, grow a family, and be part of a community -- occupies the heart of Morrison's body of work. How fitting then that her latest book has such a simple title: Home.
Cosmetic surgery is an oiled rope. You cannot grasp it and remain where you are. The moment you "correct" what you perceive as an "imperfection," you are on a slide.