The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Mickey Rowe discusses the ongoing fight for disability representation on stage.
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As a social media professional, the ability to be unique and different, to resonate with your audience, and to write concisely are essential. The more you can improve in these areas, the more successful you're likely to be.
If we listen closely, children can remind us of what is truly important in life and refresh our jaded, grown-up viewpoints. These twelve inspiring, funny, and memorable novels, narrated by children, are exemplary of the notion that kids, while they can say the darndest things, are often wise beyond their years.
Tyler Lea is currently playing the lead role of Christopher, a teenager on the autism spectrum, in the Tony-Award Winning Play The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. I caught up with Tyler on a Saturday morning to discuss taking on such a powerful role.
It's approximately 24 hours since the Tony Awards ended -- and, while most of the community is at a Bombshell party, I feel like it's about time to reflect on the night that was.
It was a evening of stars at the 69th Annual TONY Awards last night, with some surprise wins -- rather, vindication for dedicated fans who were excited to see favorites win across categories. The little musical that could, which began at the Public Theater in SoHo and has now swept the TONY Awards just a year later.
Facing a crowd that included his mother and brother as well as Tony Danza, next up for a run at the Café Carlyle, Alan Cumming reminded everyone that he would be hosting the Tony Awards with Kristen Chenoweth on Sunday night, admitting that he was "freaking out."
It's a little hard for me because I tend to think more in terms of Tony Awards seasons and less in terms of calendar years. That said, "favorite show" is not "favorite new show;" it is really "favorite show open in 2014," which is easier.
This was a relatively strong year; where the canker gnaws, as good old blimey slimey Captain Hook might say, is in the musical department.
It hard to find the silver lining in the cold, blustery weather and increasingly shorter days that mark December in New York, but one thing is the guilt for staying indoors completely evaporates.
All the stay-wide-awake light and sound accompanies action taking place in the not very well-provided senior-class library at a Stockport school in England's north country. There, a group of privileged students hang out when they're not scheduled for a class or when they're scheduled for a class but don't feel like going.
Is this the best fall theater season in years? I think so. While I don't do reviews really, I felt the need to discuss this amazing season we're having. It would kick last season's butt in almost any competition.
So striking is the production design, so remarkable is Alex Sharp's performance as Christopher Boone, we enter into the literal, mathematically precise mind of a 15-year-old autistic English boy with chilling accuracy.
With a first-rate cast led by a superb performance by Alex Sharp as Christopher, a smart and faithful script by Simon Stephens
I love the fall theater season. First, fall is my favorite time of the year in the city. Second, the fall theater season is chock full of new offerings, but the pressure to see them right away is less than it is with spring offerings, as the Tony Awards isn't as imminent.
There are plays that entertain, plays that illuminate, and plays that bring us to an exalted new place. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time, at the Ethel Barrymore, does all three.
For a change of pace, today I'm offering you a series of random theater-related thoughts. None of which could take up a post on its own, but together they seem worthy.
Six days in London bring the opportunity to catch up on seven shows that have opened since my last visit. I could have more industriously caught nine by juggling the schedule, but one does have other obligations.