The End of the Tour

David Foster Wallace spent the last years of his life teaching creative writing at Pomona College. Pomona College is no more than a 10-minute walk from where I live. It is also where David Foster Wallace chose to end his life in September 2008 at age 46.
The actor talks Oscar buzz, playing David Foster Wallace and success.
"Hey, we’ve got good TV these days! I’m in the embarrassment-of-riches category."
Wallace and his work (Infinite Jest in particular) have been formative and dear to me in a way that's difficult to express without sounding disturbed. Wallace's prose is absolutely singular, combining brilliant playful formalism, gleeful trivia and an unabashed devotion to raw sincerity.
There is nothing wrong with not liking the writing of David Foster Wallace, but placing all of his many fans in a bubble of "literary chauvinism" is an unjust and narrow-minded approach to express said dislike.
The End of the Tour is focused on human connection through conversing openly, and considering that the contents of these conversations came directly from two perspicacious writers, it never ceases to fascinate and enlighten.
By 1996, upon the publication of the gargantuan novel Infinite Jest, its author David Foster Wallace was the envy of writers. Touted in exalted ways, praised as brilliant, his work produced an "anxiety of influence" for the literary.
If The End of the Tour encourages some people to dive into "Infinite Jest," so much the better. If it doesn't, I think that's OK too.
Jason Segel gives a performance of enormous compassion and sensitivity as author David Foster Wallace in The End of the Tour. The film is based on the audiotapes of a four-day marathon interview of Wallace by Rolling Stone reporter David Lipsky, played by Jesse Eisenberg.
"I was at a point in my career where this is what I was looking for."
What does it tell the generations of women and people of color who have watched hundreds of movies about true to life straight white men become geniuses in the span of 120 minutes, but no one who looks like them?
The End of the Tour is a careful exploration of one of the most intelligent, observant and complicated minds of the twentieth century. David Foster Wallace had an unmatched appreciation for the minute details of our ever-expanding modern world. And he was able to articulate them.
Why have we chosen to move further and further away from Wallace’s brilliant work?